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The Latest: Panel hashing out gas tax deal to resume Monday

March 29, 2019

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Latest on Ohio lawmakers deliberating over a proposed gas tax change (all times local):

5:20 p.m.

A joint Senate-House committee working on a compromise over a new state gas tax has delayed its work until Monday.

The committee is trying to iron out differences between an 11-cent increase proposed by Gov. Mike DeWine and House Speaker Larry Householder and a 6-cent increase proposed by Senate President Larry Obhof (AWB’-hawf). All three are Republicans.

After the committee was delayed multiple times Friday, Rep. Scott Oelslager (OHL’-slay-gur), a Canton Republican, announced late in the day without explanation that the committee would reconvene Monday.

The tax is needed to fix deteriorating roads and bridges, but lawmakers disagree on how much funding is necessary.

The House and Senate, in the meantime, have agreed on more public transportation funding, adding $70 million a year, up from the current $33 million.

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3:15 p.m.

A joint Senate-House committee working on a compromise over a new state gas tax has once again delayed a scheduled meeting.

The committee is trying to iron out differences between an 11-cent increase proposed by Gov. Mike DeWine and House Speaker Larry Householder and a 6-cent increase proposed by Senate President Larry Obhof (AWB’-hawf). All three are Republicans.

The committee announced three starting times Friday and then postponed them, indicating a stalemate continues. The tax is needed to fix deteriorating roads and bridges, but lawmakers disagree on how much funding is necessary.

The House and Senate, in the meantime, have agreed on more public transportation funding, adding $70 million a year, up from the current $33 million.

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9:45 a.m.

Gov. Mike DeWine and House and Senate lawmakers are continuing work on a compromise to raise the state gas tax to fix deteriorating roads and bridges.

A joint Senate-House committee was scheduled to meet Friday to iron out differences between their plans in the state Department of Transportation budget.

DeWine and House Speaker Larry Householder, both Republicans, announced a deal Thursday under which the gas tax would rise by 11 cents per gallon and diesel fuel by 20 cents.

But Senate lawmakers aren’t on board yet. Householder says the current Senate proposal involves an 8.5 cents-per-gallon gasoline increase and a 13 cents-per-gallon increase on diesel.

The House and Senate in the meantime have agreed on more public transportation funding, adding $70 million a year, up from the current $33 million.