IN THE NEWS: GOOGLE TRACKING

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — An about-face for Google. The online giant has revised an erroneous description on its website of how its "Location History" setting works, clarifying that it continues to track users even if they disable the setting. The change comes three days after an Associated Press investigation revealed several Google apps and websites store user location — even if users turn off Location History. Google hasn't changed its location-tracking practice in that regard. But its help page for the Location History setting now states: "This setting does not affect other location services on your device." It also acknowledges "some location data may be saved as part of your activity on other services, like Search and Maps." The AP observed the change occurred midday yesterday, a finding confirmed by Internet Archive snapshots taken earlier in the day.

IN THE NEWS: GOOGLE - CHINA

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — More than a thousand Google employees have signed a letter protesting the company's secretive plan to build a search engine that would comply with Chinese censorship. The letter calls on company executives to launch a review into ethics and transparency at the California-based company. One of the things the letter specifies is that most employees only found out about the Chinese project, nicknamed Dragonfly, through media reports.

ON THE WEB: KROGER LOOKING INTO DRIVERLESS DELIVERY SERVICE

CYBERSPACE (AP) — The nation's largest grocery chain is looking into using driverless cars to deliver groceries. Kroeger's pilot program was launched yesterday in the Phoenix suburb of Scottsdale. There, a local clerk loaded the back seat with full grocery bags — and sent it off to its destination. The car had a man in the driver's seat and another in the front passenger seat; both were there to monitor the car's performance.

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Online:

Kroeger's site: http://www.kroeger.com

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Follow Oscar Wells Gabriel II on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OWGabriel2