ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Latest on a top Minnesota GOP official's request to be paid a 10 percent commission on large donations to the party (all times local):

3 p.m.

The Republican chairman of one of Minnesota's congressional districts is criticizing his state party chairwoman's proposal to take a cut from large donations to the party.

Chairwoman Jennifer Carnahan is seeking a 10 percent commission on big donations, though she doesn't specify what size donations would qualify. She says her annual salary of $67,000 isn't enough and fundraising is the most important thing she does.

But Ted Lovdahl says that's the salary Carnahan agreed to when she took the job last spring and she needs to keep it. Lovdahl chairs the party's 8th Congressional District.

Lovdahl says her roundabout push for a raise could turn off large donors. He says it "will come back to haunt" the party if a 14-member party board approves the arrangement.

12:45 p.m.

The executive director of Minnesota's Republican Party is reacting cautiously to the chairwoman's request to get a personal cut from large donations to the party.

Chairwoman Jennifer Carnahan is seeking a 10 percent commission on big donations, though she doesn't specify what size donations would qualify. Carnahan says her annual salary of $67,000 isn't enough and fundraising is the most important thing she does.

Executive director Matthew Pagano didn't comment directly on the request but tells The Associated Press that salary adjustments are "normal" for state party chairs. He says the Minnesota GOP is in a strong financial position for the upcoming election cycle.

Party leaders are due to consider Carnahan's request Thursday.

___

12:06 p.m.

The chairwoman of Minnesota's Republican Party is seeking a commission from large donations to supplement her salary in what campaign finance experts call an unusual arrangement.

A memo obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press shows Jennifer Carnahan requesting a 10 percent payout from large contributions. Her memo to party leaders requested the commissions for the period from October 2017 through at least April 2018.

An accompanying chart showed Carnahan would get an immediate $24,500 payout.

Carnahan argued that her current pay is below market value and that she is not personally wealthy like some party leaders in other states. Her salary has not been publicized.

Carnahan and the state GOP did not immediately respond to requests for comment.