TOP STORIES:

EBOLA-OMAHA PATIENT

OMAHA, Nebraska — A surgeon who contracted Ebola in his native Sierra Leone did not receive aggressive treatment until nearly two weeks after he first started showing symptoms — a delay that doctors say probably made it impossible for anyone to save his life. By Josh Funk and Nelson Lampe. AP Photos. AP Video.

With: EBOLA-MILITARY.

FERGUSON-NATIONAL GUARD

JEFFERSON CITY, Missouri — Missouri's governor declares a state of emergency and activates the National Guard state militia ahead of a grand jury decision about whether a white police officer will be charged in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black 18-year-old in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson. By David A. Lieb. AP Photos.

With: FERGUSON-GRAND JURY-Q&A.

POPE-CATHOLIC WORLD MEETING

PHILADELPHIA — Organizers of the World Meeting of Families for months were coy when asked if Pope Francis would come to Philadelphia for the massive Roman Catholic-sponsored gathering. It turns out that when the pontiff finally confirmed his attendance organizers already had gotten inside information from an unimpeachable source: Francis told Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett during a Vatican meeting in March that he would make the journey, his first papal visit to the United States. By Kathy Matheson. AP Photos. AP Video.

With: POPE-US VISITS.

UNITED STATES-IRAN-ANALYSIS

WASHINGTON Bill Clinton tried. So did George W. Bush. Neither succeeded. As President Barack Obama's own second term winds down, he, is getting closer than either of his immediate predecessors to the goal of improving U.S. relations with Iran. But he's not there yet, and plenty stands in the way, including a messy and brutal conflict in Iraq and Syria. By Matthew Lee.

OBAMA-CLIMATE CHANGE

WASHINGTON — With just two years left in power, President Barack Obama is elevating his efforts to combat global warming above almost all else as he seeks to leave an imprint on the world that will endure after he's gone. It's a strategy rooted not only in Obama's long-stated support for such efforts, but also in political reality. By Josh Lederman.

CHARLES MANSON-MARRIAGE

CORCORAN, California — Mass murderer Charles Manson has gotten a license to marry a 26-year-old woman who visits him in prison. The marriage license viewed by The Associated Press was issued Nov. 7 for the 80-year-old Manson, who became notorious in 1969 as the leader of a roving "family" of young killers, and Afton Elaine Burton, who moved halfway across America to the site of the California prison to be near Manson. She maintains several websites advocating for Manson's innocence. By Linda Deutsch and Scott Smith. AP Photos.

COLOMBIA-CAPTURED GENERAL

BOGOTA, Colombia — President Juan Manuel Santos demands that Colombia's largest rebel group demonstrate its commitment to peace and immediately release an army general it captured Sunday, saying the resumption of suspended talks to end the half-century conflict depend on it. By Joshua Goodman. AP Photos.

STATE DEPARTMENT-COMPUTERS

WASHINGTON — A U.S. House oversight committee demanded answers Monday about a suspected cyber-attack that has shut down the State Department's unclassified email system. By National Security Writer Lara Jakes.

ISLAMIC STATE-AID WORKER

INDIANAPOLIS — The parents of an American aid worker who was beheaded in Syria by Islamic State militants said Monday their hearts are battered by their son's death but that they believe his life is proof "one person can make a difference." By Dylan Lovan.

HONDURAS-BEAUTY QUEEN

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — Honduran authorities are holding four people for questioning about the disappearance four days ago of Miss Honduras 2014, Maria Jose Alvarado, police said. AP Photo.

POLAR BEARS

WASHINGTON — A key polar bear population fell nearly by half in the past decade, a new U.S.-Canada study found, with scientists seeing a dramatic increase in young cubs starving and dying. By Science Writer Seth Borenstein. AP Photos.

PERU-SLAIN ANTI-LOGGING ACTIVIST

LIMA, Peru — The widows of four indigenous leaders allegedly slain by illegal loggers in Peru's remote Amazon complain that the investigation into their husbands' September deaths is stalled. By Franklin Briceno.

CHINESE STUDENTS KILLED

LOS ANGELES — A man convicted of killing two Chinese graduate students was sentenced Monday in Los Angeles to multiple life terms in prison by a judge who denounced him for showing no remorse and smiling while a grief-stricken victim's father spoke in court. AP Photos.

TV HOST-SCANDAL-DEATH

NEW ORLEANS — English-born TV host Scott Rogers was known in Louisiana as a squeaky-clean civic booster, but this year, allegations that he had sex with male students in his native country caught up with him. One of those students became his longtime lover and married his daughter in a sham marriage — and ultimately killed Rogers and then himself before the TV host could be indicted on federal charges. By Janet McConnaughey and Greg Katz. AP Photos.

HAITI-FIGHTING BULLS-PHOTO ESSAY

LEOGANE, Haiti — Gamblers who goad bulls to fight each other just outside this coastal town stand for hours by a riverbed scrutinizing a dozen muscular animals with horns sharpened by knives. Drumming up bets, the bulls' trainers stomp around a growing crowd in a mock rage and the agitated bulls snort as they wait to be let loose from their ropes. By David McFadden. AP photo essay by Nalio Dieu Chery.

BUSINESS & FINANCE:

AIRLINES-CHEAPER FUEL

NEW YORK — U.S. airlines are saving tens of millions of dollars every week because of lower prices for jet fuel, their largest expense. So why don't they share some of the savings with passengers? Simply put: Airlines have no compelling reason to offer any breaks. Planes are full. Investors want a payout. And new planes are on order. By Airlines Writer Scott Mayerowitz. AP Photos. AP Video.

HONDA-AIR BAG RECALL

DETROIT — Honda is quietly offering to replace potentially defective air bag inflators across the U.S., even though its latest recall for the problem only covers cars in 13 high-humidity states and territories. By Auto Writer Tom Krisher.

HALLIBURTON-BAKER HUGHES

NEW YORK — In a deal that shows just how quickly falling prices can upend the energy industry, Halliburton is buying rival oilfield services company Baker Hughes in a cash-and-stock deal worth $34.6 billion. By Energy Writer Jonathan Fahey. AP Photo.

ACTAVIS-ALLERGAN DEAL

Actavis, which is buying Botox-maker Allergan for $66 billion in one of the biggest acquisitions announced so far this year, plans to stay committed to developing new products. By Business Writer Tom Murphy. AP Photos.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT:

BILL COSBY

NEW YORK — After Bill Cosby settled a civil lawsuit in 2006 alleging that he'd repeatedly sexually assaulted a woman, his image as America's dad may have been temporarily tarnished, but was far from destroyed. But in recent weeks as allegations of other sexual assaults have taken hold in published reports and on social media, his rock-solid persona seems in danger of permanent erosion. By Television Writer Frazier Moore. AP Photos.

PEOPLE-WENDY WILLIAMS

NEW YORK — Though the Lifetime movie "Aaliyah: The Princess of R&B" drew criticism from fans upset with casting and the way it depicts Aaliyah's life, executive producer Wendy Williams says she wouldn't do anything differently if she had it to do again. By Lauri Neff. AP Photo.