SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The Latest on South Dakota's primary election (all times local):

11:50 p.m.

South Dakota Secretary of State Shantel Krebs says she's still convinced there's an opportunity for reform in Washington after falling short of Dusty Johnson in the Republican congressional primary.

Krebs thanked supporters Tuesday for their hard work after her loss in the primary race, saying she prays South Dakota's next U.S. representative will be part of that reform. Johnson, a former Public Utilities commissioner, also triumphed over state Sen. Neal Tapio in primary.

Tapio wished Johnson well in the upcoming general election, saying he's been a "loyal soldier for the Republican party in South Dakota." Johnson will face Democratic former judge Tim Bjorkman in the fall.

___

11:20 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem says her victory in the Republican primary race for South Dakota governor came from traveling the state and talking about policies that cast a bold new vision.

The four-term congresswoman beat Attorney General Marty Jackley in Tuesday's primary race. She takes on Democratic state Sen. Billie Sutton in November.

Noem says she expects the general election to be competitive. She says the primary race was a "hard-fought campaign" but her team is ready to keep working.

A former state legislator, Noem is the first GOP woman to win the nomination.

___

11:10 p.m.

Dusty Johnson, the Republican winner in a U.S. House primary, says voters rewarded a "hardworking, policy-focused, positive campaign."

Johnson, a former Public Utilities commissioner, beat Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio in Tuesday's primary. Heading into November, Johnson says his campaign will build an enormous coalition of people who care about the country and believe limited government could make it better.

Johnson will face Democratic former judge Tim Bjorkman in the fall. They are competing for the seat that U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem is vacating to seek the governor's office.

Johnson was endorsed by his former boss, Gov. Dennis Daugaard, and ran a well-funded campaign as a more traditional conservative in the Republican primary race.

___

11 p.m.

Democrat Billie Sutton says he's ready for a race to November in South Dakota's gubernatorial campaign.

Sutton, a state senator and former professional rodeo cowboy, faces U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem, who won Tuesday's Republican primary.

Sutton is portraying himself as an outsider. He says state government needs to be cleaned up from "partisanship, backroom deals and a culture of complacency." He calls the race a choice between new leadership or Washington-style politics.

Noem, who beat Attorney General Marty Jackley, hasn't yet commented on her win.

___

10:40 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem has won South Dakota's Republican primary for governor in her bid to become the state's first woman governor.

Noem beat Attorney General Marty Jackley on Tuesday, becoming the first GOP woman to win the nomination. The campaign soured at the end as the candidates sought to break out.

Noem overcame criticisms that she turned the race negative and broke several congressional campaign promises. Noem — who was first elected to Congress in 2010 — touted her role negotiating Republicans' recent federal tax cuts with President Donald Trump and her farming and ranching background.

Noem will face Democrat Billie Sutton, a state senator and former professional rodeo cowboy, in the general election. Sutton avoided a primary, allowing him to bank cash.

Meanwhile, former Public Utilities Commissioner Dusty Johnson won the GOP primary for South Dakota's U.S. House seat. He faces against Democratic former judge Tim Bjorkman in the fall.

___

10:25 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem is leading Attorney General Marty Jackley in South Dakota's Republican primary for governor, the top prize in Tuesday's election.

Noem led Jackley by some 15 percentage points with the vote tally more than two-thirds complete. The winner will advance to face Democratic state Sen. Billie Sutton in November.

Dusty Johnson, a former Public Utilities commissioner, had a comfortable lead in the Republican House primary.

Voters easily approved changes to Marsy's Law aimed at relieving the law's burden on law enforcement and prosecutors.

___

10:10 p.m.

The South Dakota "Marsy's Law" campaign says crime victims have earned a monumental victory after voters passed a constitutional amendment making changes to the victims' bill of rights.

Marsy's Law for South Dakota state director Erinn Mahathey said Tuesday that crime victims, law enforcement and others worked tirelessly to "clarify, strengthen and elevate crime victims' rights in South Dakota."

The amendment made changes to the original Marsy's Law amendment voters passed in 2016. Officials say Marsy's Law has had unintended consequences since it first passed such as causing problems for law enforcement and prosecutors and increasing costs for counties.

The amendment voters approved Tuesday requires victims to opt in to many of their rights and lets authorities share information with the public to help solve crimes.

___

10:05 p.m.

South Dakota voters have approved changes to the "Marsy's Law" victims' bill of rights to ease the burden on law enforcement and prosecutors.

The amendment approved Tuesday requires victims to opt in to many of their rights and specifically allows authorities to share information with the public to help solve crimes.

Officials say Marsy's Law has had unintended consequences since it first passed in 2016, including causing problems for authorities and increasing costs for counties.

State House Speaker Mark Mickelson initially proposed getting rid of the amendment but instead reached a deal with the Marsy's Law campaign on the constitutional changes.

South Dakota is the first state to change its version of Marsy's Law, though Montana's high court tossed it out in that state.

___

9:45 p.m.

Election results are coming in in South Dakota, where the Republican primary for governor was the top contest.

The last polls open in Tuesday's election shut down at 8:45 p.m. Mountain time, 9:45 p.m. Central time after computer glitches required longer hours at some polling places in Pennington County. They would have normally closed at 7 p.m. local time.

In the governor's race, Attorney General Marty Jackley faced off against U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem. Democratic state Sen. Billie Sutton, running unopposed, awaited them.

The choice for the GOP's congressional candidate was between former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio.

Voters also weighed whether to make changes to the "Marsy's Law" victims' bill of rights in the state constitution.

___

8:10 p.m.

Polls have closed across South Dakota except for some locations in Pennington County that experienced voting delays caused by computer glitches.

Some polling places will have hours extended during Tuesday's primary election as late as 8:45 p.m. Mountain time, 9:45 p.m. Central time. The normal poll closing time is 7 p.m. local time.

The later hours mean that the results of the primary election will also be delayed.

The Secretary of State's office says intermittent loss of connectivity with electronic poll books used to verify voters are in the right precinct caused voting delays in Pennington and Hughes counties.

Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other races.

___

4:30 p.m.

A Sioux Falls man says he has voted for Attorney General Marty Jackley in South Dakota's Republican governor primary despite concerns about his handling of a case involving a former law enforcement agent who won a state settlement.

Ken Yost said Tuesday that he "swallowed real hard" and voted for Jackley. The 79-year-old Yost, a retired teacher, says the settlement issue was a "question mark" in his mind in the governor primary between Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem.

Noem's campaign accused Jackley of trying to silence the victim, who received a $1.5 million state settlement after she won a discrimination and retaliation lawsuit. Jackley's campaign has said he's a tireless advocate for victims.

Yost says Jackley has experience as state attorney general, a good record of pursuing criminals and puts forward an image that he's a "can-do kind of person."

___

3:45 p.m.

A Sioux Falls woman who voted for U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem in South Dakota's Republican primary for governor says Noem has represented the state well in Washington.

Patricia McKeever said Tuesday she appreciates that Noem has supported President Donald Trump. Noem is running against Attorney General Marty Jackley.

The 74-year-old McKeever says Noem has proven herself as a businesswoman. McKeever says the "last point on the list" is that she wants to see the first female governor in South Dakota.

Republican primary voters are also picking a candidate for a statewide congressional seat. McKeever, a retiree who now works at a church, says she voted for Dusty Johnson because he impressed her.

Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and Sen. Neal Tapio are also in the House primary.

___

3 p.m.

Results of South Dakota's primary election will be delayed because computer glitches are resulting in longer hours at some polls.

Under state law, returns cannot be disclosed until all polls in South Dakota have closed. The Secretary of State's office says results of Tuesday's primary won't be released until 9:45 p.m. Central time, 8:45 p.m. Mountain time.

In Pennington County, three polling places won't close until that time. Election officials said earlier that intermittent loss of connectivity with electronic poll books has caused voting delays in Pennington and Hughes counties and will require some polling places to stay open later

The normal poll closing time is 7 p.m. local time.

Republicans are choosing between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem in the governor's race. The choice for the GOP's congressional candidate is between former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio.

___

12:45 p.m.

The Secretary of State's office says intermittent loss of connectivity with electronic poll books has caused voting delays in Pennington and Hughes counties and will require some polling places to stay open later during the primary election.

The office said Tuesday the counties are deciding which polling places will extend hours beyond 7 p.m. local time. Officials say the issue affected eight counties that use electronic poll books, but it has been resolved.

The counties are: Brookings, Brown, Hughes, Hyde, Pennington, Potter, Sully and Yankton. Officials say some counties started using paper voter registration lists and poll books, while others resolved the issues with the electronic poll book vendor.

Pennington County Auditor Julie Pearson says some polling places will stay open later to accommodate delays, which for some polls were nearly two hours long.

Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other races.

___

11:50 a.m.

Computer issues have meant longer-than-usual wait times for voters in South Dakota's Brown County.

Election workers are trying to keep the lines moving for Tuesday's primary election.

Brown County Auditor Maxine Fischer tells the Aberdeen American News that people are voting but "it just takes time to look up the names."

Poll workers have to do the work manually because the computer system used to scan driver's licenses and find the correct ballot has been down at times. When voters arrive, election workers are taking their names and going upstairs to check them on the auditor's computer system.

Ten different ballots are being used Tuesday in Brown County, which is having votes for school board, Aberdeen City Council and South Dakota's partisan primary.

___

11 a.m.

Elections officials say issues with electronic poll books caused delays at several primary voting locations across South Dakota.

Pennington County Auditor Julie Pearson says voting resumed after paper poll books were delivered to the locations involved, including Rapid City. Officials did not immediately say how many locations are involved.

The Rapid City Journal says some Rapid City residents were unable to vote early because of the computer problems. Pearson says polling locations with problems are expected to remain open beyond the 7 p.m. usual closing.

Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other races.

Republicans are choosing between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem in the governor's race.

The choice for the GOP's congressional candidate is between former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio.

___

7 a.m.

Polls are open in South Dakota where Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other.

Voters went to the polls early Tuesday under sunny skies and temperatures in the 60s. Republicans are choosing between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem in the governor's race.

The choice for the GOP's congressional candidate is between former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio.

While voting in the GOP governor, House and state legislative races is reserved for registered Republicans, all voters are casting ballots on changes to the "Marsy's Law" victims' bill of rights.

____

11:23 p.m.

Republican primary voters picking a nominee for South Dakota governor also will select a candidate for a statewide congressional seat while joining other residents in weighing changes to the "Marsy's Law" victims' bill of rights.

The polls will be open Tuesday from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. local time, with Republicans choosing in their governor primary between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem.

Former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio are competing to be the GOP's congressional candidate.

While voting in the GOP governor, House and state legislative races is reserved for registered Republicans, all voters will be able to cast ballots on Constitutional Amendment Y. That measure would tweak Marsy's Law to cut down on unforeseen problems it has created.