PASADENA, Texas (AP) _ A judge has ordered Gilley's nightclub, a local institution that was the primary setting for the 1980 movie ''Urban Cowboy,'' to close its doors indefinitely.

''That's it. It's over, they won. They booted us out today,'' Sherwood Cryer, the club's longtime owner, said Thursday.

Cryer lost a $17 million lawsuit to recording artist Mickey Gilley last summer and declared bankruptcy. He also lost the rights to use Gilley's name, but Cryer continued to run the 70,000-square foot club while he appealed the ruling.

The hearing was prompted by a break-in and theft of electronic equipment Monday at Gilley's Recording Studio adjacent to the club in this Houston suburb.

Attorneys for Gilley suggested the robbery was ''an inside job.''

A court-appointed receiver obtained court permission Thursday to close the bar in order to protect assets, said Kevin McEvily, one of Gilley's attorneys.

Security guards, some armed with shotguns, stood outside the property Thursday night.

Three convenience stores and another Pasadena nightspot owned by Cryer also were ordered closed, McEvily said.

In his Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection filing, Cryer listed $500,000 in personal assets and $18 million in debts, including $15 million owed to Gilley.

''Urban Cowboy'' starred John Travolta and featured the club's mechanical bulls and vast dance floor.