HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Latest on the Pennsylvania Senate's consideration of a plan to close a $2.2 billion budget gap (all times local):

1:20 p.m.

A spokesman for the House Republican majority says lawmakers will have "questions and concerns" about a Senate plan to close a $2.2 billion gap in the Pennsylvania budget with a mix of borrowing and higher taxes.

Stephen Miskin reacted Thursday after the Senate passed legislation to balance the $32 billion budget.

House Republicans failed to reach agreement last week on a revenue plan that would have borrowed against Pennsylvania's annual share of the 1998 multistate settlement with tobacco companies and included no new taxes. The Senate plan includes the tobacco money and new or higher taxes on Marcellus Shale drilling and consumers' utility bills.

Miskin says the Senate plan was "not shared, nor agreed to" by House leaders prior to passage, "so a review of what's actually in these bills is necessary." He says there's no timetable for the House to return to Harrisburg to consider the legislation.

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12:05 p.m.

Gas drillers are denouncing legislation passed by the Pennsylvania Senate that would impose a severance tax on natural gas production, while environmental advocates assert the bill "emasculates" state regulators who oversee the industry.

The Senate approved a plan to balance the $32 billion state budget that includes a severance tax expected to generate about $100 million per year, as well as a new tax on consumers' natural gas bills.

The Marcellus Shale Coalition industry group asserts the taxes will "erode the commonwealth's competitive advantage" and cost jobs.

Other provisions of the legislation address industry complaints about the lengthy permitting process for new gas wells.

Environmental advocates and former secretaries of the Department of Environmental Protection say the provisions gut DEP's ability to regulate properly and should be challenged in court.

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11:15 a.m.

The Pennsylvania Senate has passed legislation to balance the state budget that includes heavy borrowing and some tax increases.

Under the plan, consumers' utility bills would go up, Marcellus Shale drillers would pay a severance tax and Pennsylvania would make a new effort to capture tax revenue from internet sales.

Republicans who control the chamber unveiled their plan to close a $2.2 billion hole in the $32 billion state budget late Wednesday. It includes a proposal to borrow $1.3 billion against Pennsylvania's annual share of the 1998 multistate settlement with tobacco companies.

The legislation passed 26-24. It drew the support of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, but could run into trouble in the tax-averse House.

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10:25 a.m.

The Pennsylvania Senate is back in session, weighing a plan for balancing the state budget that includes heavy borrowing and some tax increases.

Under the plan, consumers' utility bills would go up, Marcellus Shale drillers would pay a tax they've long resisted and Pennsylvania would make a new effort to capture tax revenue from internet sales.

Republicans who control the chamber unveiled their plan to close a $2 billion hole in the $32 billion state budget late Wednesday. It includes a proposal to borrow $1.3 billion against Pennsylvania's annual share of the 1998 multistate settlement with tobacco companies.

The legislation cleared a key committee late Wednesday.

The bill is drawing the support of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, but it could run into trouble in the tax-averse House.

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1 a.m.

Consumers' utility bills would go up, Marcellus Shale drillers would pay a tax they've long resisted and Pennsylvania would make a new effort to capture tax revenue from internet sales under legislation poised for a vote in the state Senate.

Republicans who control the chamber unveiled their plan to close a $2 billion hole in the $32 billion state budget late Wednesday, including a proposal to borrow $1.3 billion against Pennsylvania's annual share of the 1998 multistate settlement with tobacco companies.

The legislation cleared a key committee late Wednesday. The full Senate will vote on it Thursday.

The bill is drawing the support of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, but it could run into trouble in the tax-averse House.