ATLANTA (AP) _ Coca-Cola chairman Roberto C. Goizueta was in critical condition with a throat infection related to recent treatments for lung cancer.

The 65-year-old Goizueta, who was in intensive care Monday at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, will miss a board meeting Thursday for the first time since he became chairman of the soft drink giant 16 years ago.

Goizueta was hospitalized Sept. 6 after being diagnosed with cancer and began chemotherapy and radiation treatments. He was released on Sept. 22 but was readmitted last Tuesday with a throat infection. Chemotherapy weakens the immune system, making the throat infection more dangerous.

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ACAPULCO, Mexico (AP) _ Battered by a hurricane that claimed more than 210 lives, Mexico's most famous resort is struggling to dig out from under tons of mud that badly damaged its already faded luster.

Once glitzy, ritzy and awash with Hollywood stars, Acapulco's debacle is an enormous setback for a beach town that for years has seen trendier, newer resorts siphon off business. Tourism is the lifeblood of this city of more than 1 million, and Mexico's biggest source of income next to oil.

About 5 million people _ 70 percent of them Mexican _ visited Acapulco last year, spending $1.2 billion _ down from $1.36 billion in 1994. Officials now fear publicity about Pauline's two-day tantrum last week will send foreigners packing for other climes _ just before the peak winter tourism season.

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AMSTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) _ The owner of Lexis-Nexis and a slew of trade magazines made a big push to boost its electronic information business by merging with one of its biggest rivals.

Reed Elsevier, the world's largest publisher of academic and trade journals, is combining with Dutch publisher Wolters Kluwer in a deal that values Wolter at about $7.8 billion.

The marriage Monday would create a publishing powerhouse, Elsevier Wolters Kluwer, that would have had $6.6 billion in combined sales last year with operations in North America, Europe and Asia.

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) _ Columbia/HCA Healthcare Corp. appointed an ethics czar to head a new ethics office, the embattled company's latest effort to mend relations with the federal government.

Facing a wide-ranging federal Medicaid and Medicare fraud investigation, Nashville-based Columbia on Monday hired Alan Yuspeh as senior vice president of ethics, compliance and corporate responsibility.

A former partner in a Washington law firm who has taught at the Georgetown University School of Business, Yuspeh has helped many companies ensure they are complying with government contracts. Columbia faces a federal investigation into alleged allegedly overbilling of federal health programs by more than $1.7 million.

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ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) _ Gannett Co., the publisher of USA Today and the nation's leading newspaper group, reports earnings fell 63 percent in the third quarter from a year ago, when it had a huge gain on the sale of its billboard advertising business.

But profits from its continuing operations jumped 37 percent in the quarter ended Sept. 28, as Gannett benefited from stronger newspaper advertising and a drop in the price of newsprint.

Gannett said Monday its profit fell to $152.5 million, or 54 cents a share, in the third quarter, compared with $414.7 million, or $1.47 a share, in the comparable 1996 period. A year ago, profit included a one-time, after-tax gain of $294.6 million, or $1.05 a share, from the sale of its billboard business to Phoenix-based Outdoor Systems Inc.

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LUXEMBOURG (AP) _ Italy remains on track to qualify for the single European currency despite the political crisis created by preparations for the monetary union, Italian finance officials said.

Treasury Minister Carlo Ciampi told a meeting of worried finance ministers of the European Union Monday that Italy's budget deficit will shrink to the 3 percent target allowed nations taking part in the currency.

Nations adopting the euro currency, scheduled to be launched Jan. 1, 1999, must meet strict economic criteria, including budget deficits no greater than 3 percent of gross domestic product.

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KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) _ Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc. said it is moving its headquarters from London to the East Coast and shifting or cutting 600 jobs from Kalamazoo.

Relocating the home office of the pharmaceutical giant will help it respond more quickly to market changes and keep it ``tightly linked to the marketplace'' Fred Hassan, who became chief executive officer in May, said Monday.

The drug maker, whose products include Rogaine hair restorer and Nicotrol nicotine patches, said its new headquarters will be in the mid-Atlantic region, where many of the company's competitors are based. Officials declined to name a specific location.

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LONDON (AP) _ Britain warned that too many countries were failing to set targets to limit gas emissions that lead to global warming, clinging instead to short-term national interests.

Foreign Office Minister Derek Fatchett said Monday his country will take the lead in pushing for ``significant reductions'' in heat-trapping ``greenhouse'' gases at a climate summit in Kyoto, Japan, in December.

The climate summit is aimed at negotiating a treaty to address what many scientists believe is the slow warming of Earth's atmosphere by increased industrialization and the emission of such gases as carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane.

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CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) _ President Clinton signed a $21 billion spending bill packed with energy and water projects that make it a likely target for the line-item veto.

The president has five working days after signing a bill to exercise his line-item authority. He signed the bill Monday on a three-nation trip through South America.

The energy and water development appropriations act contains scores of projects Clinton did not seek. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has complained that the measure included $32 million for seven projects not contained in either the original House or Senate bill.

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By The Associated Press

The Dow Jones industrial average rose 27.01 to 8,072.22 in lifeless Columbus Day holiday trading.

The dollar rose and gold fell. The Treasury bond market was closed for the holiday.

Crude oil futures and its products fell sharply, as soybean and corn futures gained.