NORTH BERGEN, N.J. (AP) _ Timothy Kides pumped out 125,001 sit-ups to finish a 3 1/2 -day fund- raising marathon that raised $20,000 for a local group battling cerebral palsy.

Kides said he overcame an early bout of leg soreness and finished Friday night with his stomach feeling tight but not sore. He didn't sleep during the ''Sit-Up Challenge'' but drank a lot of fluids and ate sandwiches.

''Twenty thousand dollars he raised ... that's what America is all about,'' said Tom Bertoli, founder of Volunteers of North Bergen, which helped arrange the event.

The Guinness Book of World Records mark for most sit-ups is 100,003, set by Lou Scripa Jr. of Sacramento, Calif., in 1985.

Kides, a substitute teacher who has held several other sit-up fund-raisers, previously captured a spot in Guinness for doing 25,000 leg-raises.

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SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) - Some people suggested it was a waste of time, and not even the organizers of a contest to identify animal droppings could deny that waste was involved.

The competition Thursday provided a light-hearted send-off to more than 250 people who attended the American Zookeeper Association's yearly conference this week.

''Bewing able to identify feces has its practical uses,'' said Tom LaBarge, curator of carnivores for Syracuse's Burnet Park. 'You can tell a lot about an animal by analyzying its feces. It's usually the first indication if something is wrong.''

The specimens - in plastic bags - were laid out on several tables to be identified by sight alone.

There were brief hints in many cases, but No. 20 - a single dropping the size of a coconut - simply said: ''No clue needed.'' Everyone answered elephant correctly.

Nearly everyone was stumped by the feces of the sea cucumber, a primitive invertebrate. The clue was: ''Not something you'd put in a salad.''

Frank Kohn of the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., was a bit bemused by the hoopla.

''I never see the stuff in plastic bags - and we never get clues,'' Kohn said. ''We just scoop it up,''