HARTFORD, Vt. (AP) — In a story Aug. 15 about food composting in Vermont, The Associated Press erroneously reported when the Legislature passed a law requiring the composing of food scraps. Act 148 was passed in 2012, not last month. The story should also have noted that only some transfer stations were not seeing many people composting.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Some waste transfer stations not seeing many people composting

Vermont's effort to move toward universal recycling has seen legislative success, but some waste officials say they haven't seen many residents take advantage of new food scrap disposal units

HARTFORD, Vt. (AP) — Vermont's effort to move toward universal recycling has seen legislative success, but some waste transfer station officials say they haven't seen many residents take advantage of new food scrap disposal units.

In 2012 Vermont legislators passed Act 148, which requires solid waste transfer stations to accept food scraps and other organic waste starting July 1 this year. The Valley News reports (http://bit.ly/2waqrdU) it will become mandatory for residents in 2020.

Bob Vahey, a waste supervisor in Hartford, says he hasn't seen many people using the new organic waste disposal service so far. He doesn't think people will actively separate their waste until 2020, when everyone is required to do it.

Mary O'Brien, a district recycling coordinator, says she thinks people may just be composting at home.