Below is a list of federally recognized Native American tribes that have laws either defining marriage as between a man and a woman or explicitly prohibiting same-sex marriages, along with excerpts of those laws. At least 10 other tribes recognize same-sex marriages, while many more are silent on the matter.

— The Navajo Nation: "Marriage between persons of the same sex is void and prohibited."

— The Cherokee Nation, based in Oklahoma: "No marriage shall be contracted ... between parties of the same gender."

— The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, based in North Carolina: "The licensing and solemnization of same sex marriages are not allowed within this jurisdiction."

— The Chickasaw Nation, based in Oklahoma: "No Marriage will be recognized between persons of the same sex."

— The Kalispel Tribe of Indians, based in Washington state: "No marriage license shall be issued or marriage performed unless the persons to be married are of the opposite sex and at least sixteen (16) years of age."

— Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma: "The court is not authorized to conduct a marriage ceremony or issue a marriage certificate to a couple if they are of the same sex."

— The Muscogee (Creek) Nation, based in Oklahoma: "Same gender marriage prohibited. A marriage between persons of the same gender performed in another Indian Nation or state shall not be recognized as valid and binding in the Muscogee (Creek) Nation."

— Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin: "A marriage may be contracted under this law between two (2) adults who ... are of the opposite sex."

— The Osage Nation, based in Oklahoma: "A marriage between persons of the same gender performed in another jurisdiction shall not be recognized as valid and binding in the Osage Nation ..."

— Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa: "Same gender marriages prohibited. Only persons of the opposite gender may marry."

— The Seminole Nation of Oklahoma: "Person of the same gender will not be allowed to marry or divorce."

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Source: AP research.