BEIJING (AP) — European stocks gained in early trading today while Asian markets were mixed after U.S. President Donald Trump delivered a fresh warning to North Korea and China reported weaker but still-robust trade growth. In early trading, Germany's DAX gained 0.2 percent, France's CAC 40 added 0.2 percent and London's FTSE 100 rose 0.1 percent. Japan's Nikkei 225 index closed down 0.1 percent, Hong Kong's Hang Seng retreated 0.3 percent and the Shanghai Composite Index gained 2 points. Seoul's Kospi advanced 0.3 percent.

BEIJING (AP) —U.S. and Chinese companies have signed business deals the two sides say are valued at $9 billion during a visit by President Donald Trump. The 19 agreements were signed today at a ceremony attended by U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross Trump has made narrowing the multibillion-dollar U.S. trade deficit with China a priority of his administration. He is due to hold talks with Chinese President Xi Jinping (shee jihn-peeng).

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans have blocked Democrats' efforts to get bigger tax benefits for the cost of raising or adopting children. As the House's tax-writing committee feverishly sprints toward a completed bill by week's end, the Senate's tax bill is starting to take shape. That version is expected to completely repeal the federal deduction for state and local taxes but retain the medical expense deduction. The House GOP plan calls for repealing the adoption tax credit.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Americans would lose the ability to deduct up to $2,500 in student loan interest under the Republican tax bill, a proposal that education advocates say will make college less affordable. But supporters of the measure say the loss will be offset by other provisions in the bill. In a letter to top members of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, the American Council of Education asked lawmakers to reconsider their plan keep the deduction for student loan interest.

LONDON (AP) — Broadcaster Sky says it may shut down its British news operation if it is a hurdle to regulatory approval of 21st Century Fox's takeover bid. The statement comes in a submission to Britain's competition regulator as the agency begins an investigation into whether Fox's plan to buy the 61 percent of Sky it doesn't already own would give Rupert Murdoch and his family too much control over the country's media.