CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) _ When Virginia's basketball team needs a clutch basket, Harold Deane usually is the man.

When they needed one Tuesday night, he was the invisible man.

Deane endured one of the worst games of his career in the 15th-ranked Cavaliers' 61-48 loss to Vanderbilt. He missed 11 of 12 shots, including all eight 3-point tries, and committed four turnovers before mercifully fouling out with two minutes remaining.

``I make those shots in practice,'' he said. ``I just have to get my mind into things. I made some bad decisions and took some bad shots.''

More than once Deane launched an ill-advised try toward the basket. Some went in and then popped out, but most clanged harshly off the backboard.

Deane is a streak shooter, but he isn't used to putting up bricks, not when the Cavaliers are counting on him to carry them through.

Last Wednesday against No. 1 Kansas, Deane was decisively losing his much ballyhooed duel with Jayhawks' star Jacque Vaughn. At halftime, Deane had 3 points and Kansas was leading 35-20.

In the second half, though, Deane got hot. His 20 points over the final 20 minutes lifted Virginia within striking distance before some clutch free throw shooting carried Kansas to a 72-66 victory.

Against Vanderbilt, the stage was set for another second half show from the junior point guard. He was scoreless in the first half, his team trailed 29-24 and he was wondering when his shot would start dropping.

It never did.

``We confused Harold Deane with zone defense and a box-and-one on Curtis (Staples),'' Vanderbilt's Drew Maddux said. ``I thought he wouldn't let things get to him, but he seemed to be frustrated. You could see it in the final 10 minutes. He never was mentally or physically in the game.''

Commodores coach Jan van Breda Kolff said his game plan was structured around stopping Deane.

``I felt that as Deane goes, Virginia goes,'' van Breda Kolff said. ``In the Kansas game, they shut him down in the first half, but he brought them back in the second. I didn't want him to get in a zone.''

Deane scored his first points on an 18-foot jumper from the right corner with 15:41 remaining, then made two free throws with eight minutes left.

Late in the game, with the Cavaliers chances all but gone and people streaming out of University Hall, Deane let fly with a 3-point shot that hit nothing, causing a murmer of disbelief from the fans.

``It just didn't happen tonight,'' Deane said.