BURNS, Ore. (AP) — The latest on an armed group that took over buildings at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon (all times local):

1:55 p.m.

The FBI says its response to the occupation of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon by an armed group has been careful because authorities want to avoid violence.

In a statement Thursday the agency said the situation at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon has caused "tremendous disruption and hardship" for people in the community and our "response has been deliberate and measured as we seek a peaceful resolution."

On Thursday, the armed group's leader went to the municipal airport in Burns, Oregon, close to where officials have set up a staging area. He says he spoke with federal authorities over the phone.

Ammon Bundy said his group is "not going to escalate" the situation, and he agreed to speak with authorities again Friday.

The group began occupying the refuge in eastern Oregon on Jan. 2 to protest federal land use policies.

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12:45 p.m.

The leader of an armed group that has occupied a national wildlife refuge in Oregon for nearly three weeks says he has begun speaking with federal authorities.

Ammon Bundy went to the airport Thursday in Burns, Oregon, close to where federal officials have set up a staging area.

With reporters watching, he spoke on the phone, apparently with an FBI negotiator. The conversation was streamed online by another member of Bundy's group.

Bundy said his group is "not going to escalate" the situation, and he agreed to speak with authorities again Friday.

The FBI did not immediately comment.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said Wednesday that she is angry because federal authorities have not yet taken action against Ammon's group. The group began occupying the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon on Jan. 2 to protest federal land use policies.