Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Oklahoma. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Oklahoma City bureau at apoklahoma@ap.org or 405-525-2121.

Oklahoma Administrative Correspondent Adam Causey can be reached at acausey@ap.org or 405-996-1589.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times Central.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org

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TOP STORIES:

POLITICS & GOVERNMENT:

VOTER ROLLS-STATES

ATLANTA — A U.S. Supreme Court ruling has cleared the way for states to take a tougher approach to maintaining their voter rolls, but will they? Ohio plans to resume its process for removing inactive voters after it was affirmed in Monday's 5-4 ruling. It takes a particularly aggressive approach that appears to be an outlier among states. Few appear eager to follow. "Our law has been on the books. It hasn't changed, and it isn't changing," said Oklahoma Election Board spokesman Bryan Dean. By Christina A. Cassidy. SENT: 790 words, with photos, audio.

FROM AP MEMBERS:

REUSED SYRINGES-PATIENTS TESTED

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — A Cherokee Nation hospital in Oklahoma is testing more than 180 patients for HIV and hepatitis after allegations that a nurse reused syringes to administer medications. Cherokee officials tell the Tulsa World that the nurse violated protocols by using the same vial of medication and syringe to inject multiple intravenous bags at W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. Officials say the nurse no longer works for the tribe. 250 words.

IN BRIEF:

— CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION-OKLAHOMA — Oklahoma health officials say they are restoring funding for mandated child abuse prevention programs.

— BODY RECOVERED-OKLAHOMA — A body discovered in a pickup truck recovered from Lake Thunderbird has been identified as that of a missing Norman man.

— FATAL SHOOTING-OKLAHOMA TEEN — A 17-year-old in Tulsa will soon learn whether his defense can use state funds to hire mental health experts ahead of a jury trial in a teacher's death and other crimes.

— OKLAHOMA PRISON-WATER OUTAGE — State prison officials say water service has been fully restored at a southwestern Oklahoma unit where a water line leak emptied a tower.

SPOT MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-OBIT-COTTER-ESTATE

SAN ANTONIO — Real estate tycoon and cowboy extraordinaire James F. Cotter died as he lived, sowing confusion among the people he loved. Since his death from cardiac arrest Jan. 25, 2017, his estate has been the subject of much dispute and legal maneuvering among his surviving widow, five children, his lenders, creditors and the IRS. The San Antonio Express-News reports Cotter died at 83 without a valid will. The bulk of his estate, valued at about $288 million 13 months before his death, includes 66 properties in six states. In San Antonio, it includes the twin Alamo Towers and the two Petroleum Towers, plus property in Oklahoma. By Patrick Danner, San Antonio Express-News. SENT: 1,960 words, with photo. Moving on news & business lines.

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