NEW YORK (AP) _ There he is .... Howard Stern?

The shock jock has Miss America pageant officials pretty peeved with plans to call his new book ``Miss America,'' complete with a cover photo of Stern in full drag and make-up.

Lawyers for Miss America, the pageant, wrote the book's publisher to say Stern's second literary effort infringes on the pageant's good name and contains ``photographs that have been called tasteless.''

HarperCollins attorneys said the title of the book, due out Nov. 14, was based on a facetious theme running through the book that Stern could be the next Miss America.

Editor Judith Regan said she thought the title was pretty safe, considering the fact that some raunchy suggestions were rejected. Stern, she said, ``makes a living doing social satire and parody _ that's what he does on the radio and in this book.''

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) _ Hootie & the Blowfish's debut album ``Cracked Rear View'' has cracked the 10 million mark in sales in just 16 months.

That milestone, certified last week by the Recording Industry Association of America, is even more impressive when compared to other successful albums that have been around much longer.

Elton John's 1974 ``Greatest Hits'' album, for example, just passed the 13 million mark, and Bon Jovi's 1986 album ``Slippery When Wet'' has sold 12 million to date.

Hootie & the Blowfish, a South Carolina group whose hits singles off the album have included ``Only Wanna Be With You,'' and ``Hold My Hand,'' still has a way to go for the biggest-selling debut album. That honor is held by Boston's 1976 self-titled debut, which has sold 15 million to date.

The biggest selling album of all time is ``Thriller'' by Michael Jackson at 24 million.

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RADNOR, Pa. (AP) _ Oprah Winfrey says she's shocked, just shocked.

After hearing recent criticism of talk shows, the queen of the genre did a little channel surfing of the competition and got a taste of trashy TV that she says nearly drove her to consider quitting.

``I wonder, is this a sign that my time in TV has come and gone?'' Winfrey wrote in a commentary in the Nov. 11 issue of TV Guide. ``Should I just get out of the business and let the `Kissing Contest,' `Men Who Are Dogs,' and `Big Butt Contest' rule?''

Winfrey is ``embarrassed by how far over the line the topics have gone,'' but she acknowledged that some of her early programs contributed to the problem. For the past few years, however, she has been urging viewers to demand high-quality, uplifting television.

``It's only when viewers decide that they've had enough of violence, sensationalism and trash that it will end,'' she wrote.

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KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) _ Marlin Fitzwater saw his share of history during his years as press secretary for two presidents, and he says now may be the time for his old friend Colin Powell.

``This is his moment in history,'' Fitzwater told The Kansas City Star last week. ``I'd like to see him run.''

Fitzwater, who served presidents Reagan and Bush, is currently on a promotional tour for his new book, ``Call the Briefing!''

As for his assessment of the White House press corps: ``I think you can trust what you read. ... They're always critical, but that's their role.''

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INDEPENDENCE, Mo. (AP) _ Children's Defense Fund founder Marian Wright Edelman took time to accept an award for her work on children's issues, but that didn't stop her from working.

In accepting the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints' International Temple Peace Award on Saturday, Edelman urged an audience of 500 to fight congressional cuts in welfare programs.

``I would submit that our crisis is not a crisis of money,' Edelman said. ``It is a crisis of values.''

She said the Republican-driven budget bill, which includes tax cuts totaling $245 billion, would ``literally take food from children and give it to those who don't need it.''