AP Alaska's weekend plans:

FOR USE SUNDAY:

ALASKA-INUPIAT FACEBOOK

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Britt'Nee Brower grew up in a largely Inupiat Eskimo town in Alaska's far north, but English was the only language spoken at home. Today, she knows a smattering of Inupiaq from childhood language classes at school in the community of Utqiagvik. Brower even published an Inupiaq coloring book last year featuring the names of common animals of the region. But she hopes to someday speak fluently by practicing her ancestral language in a daily, modern setting. The 29-year-old Anchorage woman has started to do just that with a new Inupiaq language option that recently went live on Facebook for those who employ the social media giant's community translation tool. Launched a decade ago, the tool has allowed users to translate bookmarks, action buttons and other functions in more than 100 languages around the globe. For now, Facebook is being translated into Inupiaq only on its website, not its app. "I was excited," Brower says of her first time trying the feature, still a work in progress as Inupiaq words are slowly added. "I was thinking, 'I'm going to have to bring out my Inupiaq dictionary so I can learn.' So I did." By Rachel D'Oro. UPCOMING: 850 words, photos.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES, MOVING SATURDAY FOR USE ANYTIME:

HAARP-IMAGE PROBLEM

GAKONA, Alaska — HAARP has an image problem that's proving hard to shake. Short for High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program, HAARP has been the subject of conspiracy theories ever since the U.S. military started building it in the early 1990s. By Loren Holmes, Anchorage Daily News.

AP Photos.

BRONZE PILLARS

JUNEAU, Alaska — The three bronze posts unveiled under sunny skies also double as pillars. They hold up and support the vibrancy and resilience of the Tsimshian, Tlingit and Haida cultures. By Ben Hohenstatt, Juneau Empire.

AP Photos.

ALASKA DINOSAURS-CHILDREN'S BOOK

HOMER, Alaska — A new children's book out this month fulfills a request made by two Seward boys to their mother. Kai, 5, and Sylas Reising, 4, had seen a coloring book put out by the state of Texas about its dinosaurs. By Michael Armstrong, Homer News.

AP Photos, planned.

The AP-Anchorage