BALTIMORE (AP) _ Mike Hargrove called Brady Anderson into his office, shut the door, and told the outfielder that his role as an everyday player was about to change.

Anderson, mired in a season-long slump, is the latest victim of the Baltimore Orioles' youth movement.

With Chris Richard and rookie Jay Gibbons playing well, the 37-year-old Anderson will probably see limited action until he significantly lifts his .206 batting average.

``I told him that with the emergence of Gibbons and Richard, and the addition of Tony Batista, that his playing time may not be as regular as two weeks ago,'' Hargrove said.

Anderson, who hit 50 home runs in 1996, had seen limited playing time before his meeting with Hargrove, although it had nothing to do with his low batting average.

The 14-year veteran hasn't started since June 26, when he hurt his right shoulder in a game against Toronto.

``We'll see. Brady may play seven days a week or three times a week,'' Hargrove said.

Cal Ripken received a version of the same speech from the Orioles manager months ago, as did the now-departed Delino DeShields.

``He said he understood,'' Hargrove said of Anderson. ``Brady was very professional about it. I appreciated his attitude.''

Anderson, however, refused to talk to reporters seeking comment about the meeting.