Colorado at 5:15 p.m.

Thomas Peipert is on the desk and can be reached at 800-332-6917 or 303-825-0123. For access to AP Exchange and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

TOP STORIES:

COLORADO WILDFIRES

DENVER — Extreme fire danger prompted officials Monday to say they are shutting down a sprawling forest that includes some of Colorado's most stunning mountains in a region that attracts tourists from around the world, a rare tactic also being used in neighboring states as the U.S. Southwest struggles with severe drought. National forests and parks in Arizona and New Mexico have already been shut down as precautions. By Colleen Slevin. SENT: 650 words, photos.

With: COLORADO WILDFIRES-THE LATEST

MARIJUANA-MAYORS

PORTLAND — Mayors from six U.S. cities in states with legal marijuana said Monday they have formed a coalition to push for federal marijuana policy reform just days after President Donald Trump expressed support for bipartisan congressional legislation to ease the federal ban on pot. Mayors from Denver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and West Sacramento — all in marijuana-friendly states — sponsored a resolution at the U.S. Conference of Mayors in Boston that asked the U.S. government to remove cannabis from a list of illegal drugs, among other things. By Gillian Flaccus. SENT: 560 words, photo.

TRAVEL-FALCONRY

WOODSTOCK, Vt. — Falconry is an old tradition in many parts of the world, including the United Kingdom and the Middle East. But now it's starting to be offered as an activity for tourists at hotels, vineyards and other sites around the U.S., from Vermont to Colorado to California. The ancient sport of using birds of prey to hunt wild animals has existed for at least 4,000 years. Experiences designed for tourists typically show off the birds' flight and faithful return to their handlers, though in these programs, birds don't usually bring back creatures they've caught. By Lisa Rathke. SENT: 770 words, photos.

IN BRIEF:

— PLANNED PARENTHOOD SHOOTING — Colorado's highest court will not review a lower court's ruling that a man who acknowledges killing three people at a Planned Parenthood clinic can be given medication against his will.

— OFFICER-INVOLVED SHOOTING — Police officers in suburban Denver shot and killed a 34-year-old man who was wanted for kidnapping, auto theft and domestic violence.

— COLORADO RIVER-BODY — Authorities removed human remains from the Colorado River near the Colorado town of Parachute.

— COLORADO SPRINGS-DROWNING — A 12-year-old boy drowned in a swimming pool at a Colorado Springs condominium complex over the weekend.

— FINANCIAL MARKETS-BOARD OF TRADE — Wheat for Jul fell 5.50 cents at 5.1450 a bushel; Jul corn was lost 10.50 cents at 3.6725 a bushel; Jul oats rose 1.75 cents at $2.4250 a bushel; while Jul soybeans declined 15.50 cents at $9.5375 a bushel.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to apdenver@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Exchange and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

MARKETPLACE: Calling your attention to the Marketplace in AP Exchange, where you can find member-contributed content from Colorado and other states. The Marketplace is accessible on the left navigational pane of the AP Exchange home page, near the bottom. For both national and state, you can click "All" or search for content by topics such as education, politics and business.