CLEVELAND (AP) _ Bob Stern, the 5-foot-2 president of Short Sizes Inc., wanted to show that short men can dress for success, so four years ago he started developing the list of the ''10 Best-Dressed Shorter Men in America.''

At the top of the clothier's list this year: actors Tom Cruise and Michael J. Fox and White House Chief of Staff John Sununu.

Cruise and Sununu are the tallest on the list. Both are 5-foot-9, the maximum height for the list.

Stern said Cruise is a trendsetter who has turned black sunglasses and black silk shirts into a national passion, while Sununu ''never beats around the bush'' in both politics and dress.

Fox, 5-foot-5, was named to the list for the third consecutive year for ''charmingly combining a tux jacket and shirt with washed jeans and tennis shoes,'' Stern said.

Others listed, in ''descending'' order, are novelist Tom Wolfe and the former host of television's ''This Old House,'' Bob Vila, both 5-foot-8; singer Billy Joel, Broadway actor Robert Morse and Cleveland Mayor Michael R. White, 5-foot-7; gymnast and television sports analyst Bart Connor, 5-foot-6; and actor-director Danny DeVito, 5-foot-1.

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Humorist Minnie Pearl will celebrate her 50th anniversary Saturday night on the Grand Ole Opry, sharing the spotlight with country music pioneer Roy Acuff.

Pearl, 78, has requested that Acuff be on stage with her when her golden anniversary on the country music show is observed.

''I want to start it with the curtain going up and Roy Acuff singing 'The Wabash Cannonball','' she said.

Pearl also asked to spend part of the show sitting center stage on a stool, reminiscing and joking with Acuff, 87, known as ''the king of country music.''

''I love doing that, because it gives us more time with the audience,'' she said.

Acuff is her longtime friend and the only regular Opry performer who started on the show before she did. He started in 1938.

The anniversary performance will be broadcast live on cable TV's The Nashville Network from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. EST.

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ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) - Kenny Rogers broke his rule against honoring requests at concerts because someone offered to donate $25,000 to a charity in the country singer's name.

Rogers told the audience Wednesday he had received a letter from a man asking Rogers to sing ''Through the Years'' as a surprise for the man's wife on the couple's 11th anniversary. Rogers wrote the man - Jeff Burd, 31, of Edison, N.J. - that he doesn't honor requests.

But Burd, a financial consultant, persisted. His second note included an offer to give a check for $25,000 to a charity in Rogers' name.

Rogers said he was moved by the gesture. So he sang ''Through the Years,'' and performed a bonus number, ''You Decorated My Life.''

He said the donation would benefit a shelter for the homeless in Athens, Ga., where Rogers lives. So far, he has raised about $150,000 to build the shelter.

Burd and his wife, Louvette, flew to Rochester for the concert. Backstage at the Rochester War Memorial, where Rogers was appearing with Dolly Parton, Burd gave his check to Rogers' road manager, Gene Roy.

Was the serenade worth $25,000?

''Definitely,'' Burd said. ''Kenny did more than I could ask. I had requested the song from me to my wife, but he sang it for both of us. He did it better than I asked.''

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NEW YORK (AP) - Maureen O'Boyle will succeed Maury Povich next season on the syndicated ''A Current Affair'' program that Povich has anchored since 1986, a spokesman said Friday.

O'Boyle, a Charlotte, N.C., native who began her career at WECT-TV in Wilmington, N.C., currently serves as anchorwoman of the program's weekend edition. She has been anchoring the show's weekday version the last four weeks.

Povich, whose contract with the series expires in June, is leaving to co- produce and star in his own talk show.

The 51-year-old anchorman is married to CBS News star Connie Chung, who earlier this season decided to postpone her scheduled ''Face to Face With Connie Chung'' series because she wanted to try to have a baby. She is continuing to do ''Face to Face'' specials.