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Some of those confirmed dead, reported dead or missing in the terrorist attacks Sept. 11:

U.S. NAVY CMDR. PATRICK S. DUNN, 39, of Springfield, Va., called his brother after two hijacked planes crashed into the World Trade Center because his brother had been headed into Manhattan that day. His brother was fine; because of traffic he never made it. He was the last family member to talk with Dunn, who was working at the Pentagon when another hijacked plane crashed. Dunn was a surface warfare officer. ``He was extremely attached to his family and he was there when you needed him,'' said one of his sisters, Betty Dunn Hinkle. At the time of the attacks, Dunn's wife, Stephanie, was two months pregnant.

ALAN D. KLEINBERG, 39, of East Brunswick, N.J., was the kind of man who limited his outside interests so he could focus on his family, said his mother, Vicki Lerner Shoemaker. Because his 9-year-old son, Jacob, loves to skate, Kleinberg had started attending town meetings to ask for a public skating park for children. ``He hated the politics, but he was quite good at speaking,'' his mother said. Kleinberg, a securities trader at Cantor Fitzgerald, is among those lost in the World Trade Center attack.

CHRISTOPHER VIALONGA, 30, of Demarest, N.J., tried to fill the void left when his father died unexpectedly in 1999. He took his mother golfing, called her twice a day, and even moved back into the family's home. When a hijacked plane hit the World Trade Center where Vialonga worked as a foreign currency trader for Carr Futures, he called his mother. ``He said he was all right, he was near a window and he loved her,'' said Gary Vialonga, one of his two older brothers. Christopher Vialonga is among those killed in the attacks. An avid New York Jets fan, Vialonga savored tailgate parties in the parking lot at Giants Stadium. That was where many family and friends last saw him, before the Jets' home opener. ``He was larger than life, a guy you'd want to go and have a beer with, play golf with, go to a ball game with,'' Gary Vialonga said.