Colorado at 1 p.m.

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COLORADO STORM

DENVER — People on the plains of northeastern Colorado were cleaning up Monday from a powerful storm that swept through the state, ripping off roofs, flipping trucks and damaging crops. No serious injuries were reported. Meteorologists from the National Weather Service, meanwhile, were surveying the damage with authorities in Morgan and Washington counties to learn the extent of the damage and to determine whether any of it was caused by tornados. By Colleen Slevin. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 300 words by 4 p.m.

KOCH BROTHERS-MIDTERMS

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — The conservative Koch brothers' network declared Monday that it will not help elect the Republican Senate candidate in North Dakota, turning its back on the GOP in a marquee election — at least for now — after determining that the Republican challenge is no better than the Democratic incumbents. The decision sends a strong message to Republican officials across the country that there may be real consequences for those unwilling to oppose the spending explosion and protectionist trade policies embraced by the Trump White House in recent weeks. By Steve Peoples. SENT: 1,000 words.

AP Photo KSWIE501.

CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

GREELEY, Colo. — At least 24 people were treated for carbon monoxide poisoning at a weekend gathering in northern Colorado after a generator at a taco stand outside the venue leaked exhaust into the building. Greeley Police Lt. Aaron Carmichael told the Greeley Tribune people who suffered symptoms Saturday night could not walk, some had seizures and some lost consciousness. Common carbon monoxide poisoning symptoms include headaches, dizziness, nausea, weakness and confusion. SENT: 170 words.

ALSO OF COLORADO INTEREST:

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT-RELIGIOUS LIBERTY

WASHINGTON — American culture has become "less hospitable to people of faith," Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Monday in vowing that the Justice Department would protect people's religious freedom and convictions. Sessions praised a Colorado baker who refused to make a cake for a same-sex couple in a case that reached the Supreme Court and ended in his favor. That baker, Jack Phillips, was part of a panel discussion at the Justice Department summit. By Eric Tucker. SENT: 370 words, national lines. AP Photos.

IN BRIEF:

— OFFICER INVOLVED SHOOTINGS — Police in Aurora were involved in two fatal shootings over the weekend. Will be updated on merits.

— EBOLA SUSPECTED — Colorado health officials says a patient who became ill after visiting the Congo has tested negative for the Ebola virus.

SPORTS:

BBN-ROCKIES-CARDINALS

ST. LOUIS — The surging Colorado Rockies take to the road to face the St. Louis Cardinals on Monday night. Tyler Anderson goes for the Rockies, while Carlos Martinez takes the mound for the Cardinals. By David Solomon. Game starts 6:10 p.m.

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MARKETPLACE: Calling your attention to the Marketplace in AP Exchange, where you can find member-contributed content from Colorado and other states. The Marketplace is accessible on the left navigational pane of the AP Exchange home page, near the bottom. For both national and state, you can click "All" or search for content by topics such as education, politics and business.