RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia students who break school rules may no longer face the possibility of a yearlong suspension under legislation approved by the House of Delegates to address what some lawmakers call the "school-to-prison pipeline."

House Bill 1600, which passed 84-15 on Tuesday, would reduce the maximum length of a suspension from 364 days to 45 days. It is one of several measures lawmakers introduced in response to complaints that Virginia schools overreact to minor infractions - and sometimes charge students as criminals for transgressions that should draw a detention.

"At the end of the day, if our students are out of school, they're not learning," said the bill's sponsor, Democratic Del. Jeffrey Bourne, who previously served on the Richmond School Board. "We should not continue to use access to education as a punishment and expect positive results."

On its way toward passage, the bill was amended to allow school officials to impose a suspension of up to 364 days if "aggravating circumstances exist" or if the student is a repeat offender.

Del. R. Lee Ware Jr., R-Powhatan, said he historically had reservations about limiting schools' options in disciplining students. However, he called HB 1600 "a responsible middle course."

"It allows a considerable amount of latitude to educators with the responsibility of maintaining order in schools," Ware said.

HB 1600 was among a slew of proposals introduced this legislative session to address how Virginia schools discipline students. In 2015, the Center for Public Integrity reported that Virginia has one of the highest rates in the nation for referring students to law enforcement. Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, D-Prince William, has called the situation "the No. 1 civil rights issue of our modern time."

Several of the bills never made it out of committee. They included:

.HB 445, which sought to end a requirement that principals report certain misdemeanor crimes to law enforcement. The bill, proposed by Carroll Foy, was rejected in a 5-2 vote by a subcommittee of the House Courts of Justice Committee.

.HB 296, which would have prohibited suspending or expelling students in preschool through third grade, except for violent crimes, drugs or other serious offenses. The House Education Committee voted 12-10 vote to kill the legislation. The bill was sponsored by the panel's vice chair, Del. Richard Bell, R-Staunton.

Del. Mark Cole, R-Spotsylvania, opposed Bell's measure, saying it would "make our classrooms less safe."

"I don't think it's up to us to try to micromanage discipline issues in the local schools. That's why we have local elected school boards," Cole said.

While such legislation met opposition in the House, the Senate has been more receptive.

On Thursday, the Senate Education and Health Committee approved SB 170, which, like Bell's legislation, would bar suspensions and expulsions in third grade and below. The committee voted 11-4 in favor of the measure. SB 170, sponsored by Sen. William Stanley, R-Franklin County, now goes to the full Senate for consideration.

Last week, the Senate unanimously passed SB 476, sponsored by Sen. Bryce Reeves, R-Spotsylvania. Like Carroll Foy's bill, it would give school principals the discretion not to call police on students who commit misdemeanors or other minor crimes.

Reeves' measure has been assigned to the House Courts of Justice Committee - the same panel whose subcommittee killed Carroll Foy's proposal.

This story was produced by Virginia Commonwealth University's Capital News Service.