LOS ANGELES (AP) _ The son of UCLA basketball coach Jim Harrick says he is ``riddled with guilt'' over his involvement in selling a car owned by his father to a recruit's older sister.

``I'm terrified to think that I might be responsible for my father losing his job,'' Glenn Harrick said. ``Being in LA and UCLA, people always assume the worst. But it's much more innocent than it looks like in today's paper. It was just foolishly handled.''

Glenn Harrick, at 27 the youngest of Jim Harrick's three sons, was interviewed Tuesday by the Los Angeles Times.

The UCLA basketball program is being investigated by the Pacific-10 Conference and UCLA after the Times reported in its Tuesday editions that Glenn Harrick sold the car to Lisa Hodoh on Sept. 20.

The sale came two days after the woman's brother, Baron Davis, a highly-recruited 6-foot-1 point guard, verbally committed to play for the Bruins.

Davis recently began his senior year at Santa Monica Crossroads High.

The transaction is a possible NCAA violation. NCAA rules prohibit financial aid or other benefits to the recruit or the recruits' relatives or friends by any ``institution's staff member or any representative of its athletics interests.''

``The UCLA Athletic Department and the Pacific-10 Conference are jointly investigating the Bruin men's basketball program after allegations were brought to our attention by the Los Angeles Times,'' athletic director Peter T. Dalis said in a statement issued Tuesday. ``Until the conclusion of the investigation process, there will be no further comment(s) from the University.''

Glenn Harrick is employed by the Fox Sports organization in Los Angeles. Though the car, bought in 1990, was always registered in his father's name, Glenn Harrick said it was his car ``from the day it was bought,'' and that he got his father's signature on the title when he recently began thinking of selling it.

According to DMV procedures, the registered owner must sign over title.

Glenn Harrick also said he ``didn't even think (the transaction) could be an NCAA violation, didn't think twice. I had no idea.''

Department of Motor Vehicles records show Harrick bought the car, a black 1991 Chevy Blazer, in December 1990. When sold last month, it had traveled 112,960 miles.

Dalis and Hodoh said the vehicle was sold for $5,000, but the Kelley Blue Book lists the retail value of that model of the car at $12,750. However, the fact that it's not four-wheel drive and the 112,960 miles reduces it further, to about $9,100, the Times said.

``Five thousand really isn't low,'' Glenn Harrick said. ``The car had a lot of miles on it, over 100,000. The body wasn't in great shape, had some junk on it.''