Editors:

Here's a list of Georgia stories expected to move so far for this weekend - Aug. 11-12.

Moving Saturday

CONFEDERATE FLAG-VETERANS PARADE

ALPHARETTA, Ga. — A Georgia city has decided to ban the Confederate battle flag from its annual parade, which began as a tribute to Civil War veterans. Alpharetta Assistant City Manager James Drinkard says the "divisive nature" of the flag was among reasons it was seen as inappropriate for a city-sponsored event. The parade was held Aug. 4 in Alpharetta. Now, William Lathem, a leader in the Sons of Confederate Veterans, says his group will try and bring the flag back in next year's parade.

Information from WABE Radio. UPCOMING: 350 words.

Moving Sunday

HEALTH CARE-GOVERNMENT WORKERS

Georgia teachers and state employees next year won't see the types of rising health care costs seen in many industries in recent years. The Georgia Department of Community Health got approval from its board Thursday to keep premiums flat for the upcoming year for teachers and state employees. Teachers and state workers also won't see an increase in deductibles or co-pays.

Information from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. UPCOMING: 350 words.

AP Member Exchanges

Moving Saturday

EXCHANGE-BBQ FOR SCHOLARSHIPS

VALDOSTA, Ga. — The Historic Lowndes County Courthouse square was flooded with residents as music filled the air and the smell of ribs, chicken and pulled pork wafted through streets Aug. 4 for the 24th Annual 100 Black Men Barbecue. The 100 Black Men is a mentoring group founded in the 1960s to help direct youth in a positive direction in life, according to members.

By Jason A. Smith. The Valdosta Daily Times.

Moving Sunday

EXCHANGE-URBAN STYLE PROJECTS-GWINNETT

ATLANTA — The idea of mixing shops and restaurants with places to live in a single development is not an earth-shattering concept, even in the suburbs. But the sheer scope of several urban-style, mixed-use projects going up in Gwinnett — and the sizable amount of housing planned — is a notable departure from past development trends in one of metro Atlanta's largest counties.

By Tyler Estep. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.