NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Latest on a federal appeals court hearing on a strict voter ID law in Texas (all times local):

11 a.m.

Fifteen federal appeals judges are weighing arguments on whether a strict voter ID law in Texas illegally discriminates against low-income, black and Hispanic voters.

A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans ruled last year that it does.

But a majority of the 15-member court voted to re-hear the case. Arguments took place Tuesday. It's unclear when the judges will rule.

Attorneys for the U.S. Justice Department and civil rights groups say the law was passed with a discriminatory purpose and should be struck down. Texas lawyers said there is no proof of that the law has a discriminatory purpose or that it has affected minority voting.

Some 5th Circuit judges suggested that the law could be fixed, perhaps by adding more forms of acceptable ID cards.

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9 a.m.

A federal appeals court is preparing to take a second look at a Texas voter ID law.

Texas' law requires residents to show one of seven forms of approved identification. The state and other supporters of the law say it prevents fraud. Opponents, including the U.S. Justice Department, say it discriminates by requiring forms of ID that are more difficult to obtain for low-income, African-American, and Latino voters.

A three-judge panel of the New Orleans-based 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last year that the law is unconstitutional. But a majority of the 15-member court voted to re-hear the issue. Arguments before the full court are set for Tuesday morning.