PARIS (AP) _ Jazz great Lionel Hampton suffered a light cerebral hemorrhage during a performance this week and will be hospitalized at least over the weekend, his manager said today.

Roland Bertin said the 79-year-old vibraphonist and band leader, a celebrity since he played with Louis Armstrong and Benny Goodman in the 1930s, underwent a brain scan Thursday at Cochin Hospital and would have a second scan Monday. If doctors approved, Hampton would then fly back to New York, Bertin said.

The manager said Hampton, who played in Paris almost annually for many years, became ill on stage shortly after the start of his show Wednesday evening at the Theatre Bobino.

Hampton had difficulty moving his left hand, complained of feeling hot, and was taken immediately to the hospital, Bertin said.

He has since recovered normal use of his hand and remained fully conscious but has been ordered by his doctors to rest at the hospital at least until Monday, Bertin said.

''It was a transitory attack, but the doctors want to take all possible precautions because of his age,'' the manager said in a telephone interview.

The remainder of Hampton's concerts, scheduled through Saturday, were canceled.

Bertin said Hampton had a loyal following in France and enjoyed his visits to Paris.

''He feels at home here,'' Bertin said.

A native of Louisville, Ky., Hampton grew up in Chicago. His first big break came playing with Armstrong in 1930.

He played with Goodman for four years starting in 1936. In 1940, he formed his own orchestra, which became a great school for jazz musicians including Quincy Jones, Dexter Gordon, Joe Williams and Dinah Washington.

Now based in New York, Hampton has traveled extensively. Besides Europe, his tours have brought him to Latin America, the Middle East, Japan, the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand.

In between gigs, Hampton supervises his philanthropies, the Lionel Hampton Ear Research Foundation and the Lionel Hampton Endowment Fund, which gives college scholarships. The Lionel Hampton Community Development Corporation supplemented government funds to build low-income and middle-income housing projects.