IN THE NEWS: 'FIREEYE: TECH FIRMS' SECRET WEAPON AGAINST DISINFORMATION

Fighting "fake news"

NEW YORK (AP) — This past week has seen major social media sites step up their policing of online disinformation campaigns.

Google disabled dozens of YouTube channels and other accounts linked to a state-run Iranian broadcaster running a political-influence campaign.

Facebook removed 652 suspicious pages, groups and accounts linked to Russia and Iran.

Twitter took similar action shortly thereafter.

What did they have in common? The security firm FireEye.

Best known for its work on high-profile cyberattacks against companies including Target, JPMorgan Chase and Sony Pictures, FireEye is emerging as a key player in the fight against election interference and disinformation campaigns.

IN THE NEWS: SAMSUNG'S $1,000 NOTE 9 IS GREAT - BUT SO IS THE CHEAPER S9

Samsung latest notebooks similar

NEW YORK (AP) — For $1,000, the premium Galaxy Note 9 is a superb phone that showcases the best Samsung has to offer.

It's also the phone most of you won't need. That's because you can get many of the same features in Samsung's Galaxy S9 for a few hundred dollars less.

The Note 9 is the Android smartphone for those who want the latest and the greatest. There's a larger battery, with a 21 percent boost over last year's Note 8 model. The Note 9 gets 128 gigabytes of storage, double what's in the S9 and Apple's iPhones. And of course, a large screen.

But there's not much "wow" beyond that.

IN THE NEWS: UTILITIES PIVOT FROM POWER PLANTS TO GRID WORK FOR PROFITS

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Electric utilities are pouring billions of dollars into a race to prevent terrorists or enemy governments from shutting down the power grid and everything that depends on electricity in America's hyper-connected society.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security detailed last month how Russian hackers have targeted the nation's energy grid. Officials said they could have caused major blackouts, but instead, the hackers appeared more focused on reconnaissance.

The concern over cyber-threats comes as power companies shift focus to pursue extensive upgrades in software, switches and wires to enable a much more flexible distribution of electricity.

The need for big generation projects has fallen after decades of energy conservation, fewer factories and the swapping of coal-fired power plants for cheaper and cleaner-burning natural gas.