LITCHFIELD, Conn. (AP) _ A New York stockbroker who apparently was distraught over losses in the stock market committed suicide in his summer home, state police said Wednesday.

David Goldring's wife and a business associate, however, said they did not believe Goldring killed himself because of financial troubles.

Goldring, 44, a partner in the New York firm of Silberberg Rosenthal & Co., shot himself in the chest Tuesday afternoon after he was dropped off at his summer home by limousine, according to Sgt. Daniel Lewis, a state police spokesman.

A neighbor found Goldring about 8 p.m. Tuesday, police said. He was taken by helicopter to St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, where he was pronounced dead on arrival, police said.

State police had evidence that Goldring's death was related to the troubles on Wall Street, Lewis said.

''The results of our investigation are that the man had been distraught over stock market losses,'' Lewis said, declining to discuss the case further.

But Goldring's wife, in a telephone interview from the couple's New York apartment, called the remarks ''bald-faced assumptions.''

''We don't know what it had to do with, but it couldn't possibly have had to do with that,'' she said, declining to give her full name.

Mrs. Goldring said her husband left a note for her in New York, but ''he didn't mention any losses or gains.''

Goldring joined Silberberg Rosenthal in 1986 after leaving his own firm of Dritz, Goldring & Co., according to partner Jack Rosenthal.

Rosenthal also disputed the state police account.

''We have all lost money,'' Rosenthal said. ''David's losses were not important in his financial scheme. I think his family and our partners are puzzled.''

Rosenthal declined to say how much money Goldring lost in the recent stock market drop. The market plunged 508 points Oct. 19 but since then has regained about 40 percent of that loss.

Goldring is survived by his wife and two children, Rosenthal said.