METAIRIE, La. (AP) — Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins figure they've proved they can co-exist to spectacular and prolific effect.

Both big men have been named All-Star starters, giving them hope they'll be paired together beyond this season, which is Cousins' last under contract.

"First time I've ever been in an All-Star game with a teammate," the 6-foot-11 Cousins noted after practice on Friday, one day after All-Star starters were announced. "This is big for the entire city, the organization and just our team moving forward. It kind of shows what this combo has the potential to have."

The 6-10 Davis, who was the Pelicans' lone All-Star last season, sounded equally pleased by the results a decision by New Orleans to counter the trend of guard-heavy "small ball" by pairing dynamic big men who can dominate inside, handle the ball and shoot with range.

"The biggest question was, was it going to work? I think we just proved that it is and it can work," Davis said. "We feel like we complement each other."

The 24-year old Davis is averaging 26.7 points, 10.5 rebounds and 2.1 blocks per game. Cousins, 27, has averaged 25.3 points, 12.7 rebounds, 5.1 assists and 1.6 blocks. Their exploits have filled highlight reels, sometimes on plays involving one setting up the other — above the rim or otherwise.

"I'm mostly happy for DeMarcus," Davis said. "To be a starter, that's huge — huge for him. He's having a hell of a season. It's well deserved."

The comparable production from both Davis and Cousins shows that "both of those guys are willing to sacrifice for the betterment of the team," coach Alvin Gentry said. "Both of those guys are willing to leave a little bit of their game off the floor so the other guy can be good."

There's just one problem.

New Orleans hasn't won enough to be firmly on a path toward postseason play.

At 23-21, the Pelicans entered Friday night's action tied with the Los Angeles Clippers for seventh in the eight-team Western Conference playoff picture.

The Pelicans' past two results were a microcosm of their season. On Tuesday night, New Orleans beat Eastern Conference-leading Boston. The following night, they lost at Atlanta, which entered the game with the worst record in the NBA.

"We've had flashes throughout the year," Cousins said. "We're still trying to find that consistency. There's still a lot of things we need to work."

Cousins acknowledged the Pelicans have yet to master "being the team we want to be at all times ... no matter if we're playing Golden State or the Atlanta Hawks."

The Pelicans have yet to string more than three consecutive victories together this season and had developed a habit of losing to teams with losing records well before their Atlanta collapse. New Orleans has dropped home dates with Orlando, Sacramento, Dallas and New York. They've lost twice at Memphis.

If that trend continues, it could sour Cousins on the prospect of re-signing with New Orleans.

"I wasn't really concerned about accolades. I've gotten accolades. I've done everything except win," said Cousins, who spent his first seven seasons in Sacramento before his trade to the Pelicans following the 2017 All-Star game in New Orleans. "With the whole (trade) going down, what I thought I had a chance to do was win, and that's why I was OK with it."

Still, Cousins sounded confident he won't be dealt to another club when asked if he liked the league's decision to move up the trade deadline to Feb. 8 this season, before the All-Star break.

"I don't really care because I don't think I'm getting traded," Cousins said. "Hopefully I've never got to deal with it again."

If the Pelicans aren't able to make a major addition with a trade, they could get a boost from the expected return of small forward Solomon Hill from an offseason hamstring tear. Valued by the club for his defense, Hill, a former starter, is scheduled to return for the final month or so off the regular season.

In any event, the Pelicans have 38 games to make their push, starting at home Saturday night against Memphis.


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