Undated (AP) _ A 100-mile-wide band of scattered showers and thunderstorms drenched much of Texas on Wednesday, while rain fell over much of northern New England and snow fell briefly in northern Michigan.

Rains extended from southeast New Mexico across Oklahoma, southern Missouri and the Ohio Valley, and scattered heavy thunderstorms extended along the central Gulf Coast.

Thunderstorms were widely scattered elsewhere across the Southeast. Thunderstorms occurred from southeast Arizona across southern Nevada into the Owens Valley of southern California.

Light snow mixed with drizzle fell in rural Marquette County in the Michigan's Upper Peninsula. There was no accumulation.

''I said, 'Oh my God, not already,''' said Phil Seitz, Marquette cooperative extension director. ''But I've been here long enough to know it can happen anytime.''

''We could've had this way back when, but there's no report of this ever happening before,'' said National Weather Service meteorologist Tom Fendon.

Forecasters said Marquette could see a little more light snow mixed with sleet and rain overnight, as temperatures fall into the 30s.

In Texas, 5 to 6 inches of rain fell in an area stretching from Water Valley to just north of San Angelo. Some roads in Carlsbad, were covered by several feet of water. Over four inches of rain fell near the Guadalupe Mountains.

Heavier rainfall during the six hours ending at 2 p.m. EDT included 1.18 inches Boothville, La., and .87 inches at Bangor, Maine.

Temperatures around the nation at 3 p.m. EDT ranged from 51 degrees at Marquette and Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., to 98 degrees at Palm Springs, Calif., and Cotulla, Texas. The nation's low Wednesday morning was 32 degrees at Duluth and Hibbing, Minn.

Thursday's forecast called for thunderstorms from Texas across the central Gulf Coast states and the southern Atlantic Coast states. Showers and thunderstorms should be scattered along the mid-Atlantic Coast, and from the southern High Plains through much of the Plateau, as well as over southern California. Rainshowers should be scattered over New York State and New England.

Much of the nation should have high temperatures in the 70s or 80s. Highs should be in the upper 50s and 60s from the upper Mississippi Valley to New England, and over the lower Ohio Valley. Temperatures should reach the 90s from southern and central Texas to Florida and southern Georgia, and over the northern Plateau and interior parts of California, with readings of over 100 degrees across parts of the desert Southwest.