NEWPORT, Vt. (AP) — Phosphorous runoff is threatening the health of Vermont's second largest lake, but a new plan is being developed to correct the pollution issues.

Officials say the majority of Lake Memphremagog's (mem-free-MEY-gog) phosphorous loading comes from farmland runoff. Ben Copans, watershed coordinator for the state Department of Environmental Conservation, tells Vermont Public Radio an estimated 46 percent of phosphorus pollution comes from farms, and 21 percent comes from development from roads and parking lots.

The plan aims to reduce phosphorus levels by 29 percent through management of the Total Maximum Daily Load — a budget for phosphorus levels in the lake.

Only about a quarter of the lake is in Vermont, around the Newport area. The rest of the lake lies in Quebec, where it has lower phosphorus levels.

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Information from: WVPS-FM, http://www.vpr.net