Montana at 4 p.m.

The desk can be reached at 406-442-7440. For access to AP Exchange and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477. For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

UPCOMING TOMORROW:

RESERVATION KILLING

BILLINGS — Prosecutors are due to respond by Monday to a request from a Montana man to be released from prison after serving 15 years in the shooting death of his uncle. The request came after a judge threw out part of the defendant's conviction, saying that the second-degree murder case didn't meet the definition of a violent crime under federal law. (STORY ON MERITS)

TOP STORIES TODAY:

MOOSE STUDY

POWELL, Wyo. — By air and on foot, scientists have now finished capturing and collaring 60 moose in the Bighorn Mountains with sophisticated transmitters for the range's first study of the storied species. The culmination of the collaring effort by state biologists, researchers and game wardens is the first step in understanding the population, which was translocated to the Bighorns beginning in 1948. The study may also contain answers to other herds in the state, helping scientists understand why the species is struggling. By Mark Davis, Powell Tribune. An AP Member Exchange. SENT: 880 words.

SCIENCE SAYS-WILDFIRE FUEL

As temperatures rise in the U.S. West, so do the flames. The years with the most acres burned by wildfires have some of the hottest temperatures, an Associated Press analysis of fire and weather data found. As human-caused climate change has warmed the world over the past 35 years, the land consumed by flames has more than doubled. Experts say the way global warming worsens wildfires comes down to the basic dynamics of fire. Fires need ignition, oxygen and fuel. And what's really changed is fuel — the trees, brush and other plants that go up in flames. By Seth Borenstein. SENT: 930 words, photos.

IN BRIEF:

— MONTANA GOVERNOR-WEAPONS BAN — Montana's Democratic governor is saying for the first time that he'd support a ban on some semiautomatic weapons.

— MONTANA WILDFIRES — A wildfire in northwest Montana's Glacier National Park is forcing evacuations and has burned within a mile (1.6 kilometers) of the scenic Going-to-the-Sun Road.

— INVASIVE SNAIL — Montana wildlife officials say a kind of snail that's native to Europe and can lead to the death of waterfowl has been found in a lake in Pondera County.

— PILL BOXES — Montana officials are using a federal grant to install prescription drug collection boxes in pharmacies across the state.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to apdenver@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Exchange and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

MARKETPLACE: Calling your attention to the Marketplace in AP Exchange, where you can find member-contributed content from Montana and other states. The Marketplace is accessible on the left navigational pane of the AP Exchange home page, near the bottom. For both national and state, you can click "All" or search for content by topics such as education, politics and business.