LONDON (AP) — Kevin Anderson is going to the Wimbledon finals after beating John Isner in a 6-hour, 36-minute marathon. The South African edged the American 7-6, 6-7, 6-7, 6-4, 26-24. The fifth set alone lasted nearly 3 hours. Only one match at the All England Club has been longer: Isner's record-setting 2010 first-round victory over Nicolas Mahut (mah-HYOO'), which went more than 11 hours over three days and finished 70-68 in the fifth. Anderson will face Rafael Nadal or Novak Djokovic (NOH'-vak JOH'-kuh-vich) in Sunday's final.

CLEVELAND (AP) — Indians ace Corey Kluber has received an injection in his right knee that will force him to miss the All-Star Game. The two-time Cy Young winner got the shot today, a day after losing to the Yankees. The team says he will need at least one week to recover from the injection and won't make his next start until July 23 against Pittsburgh. Kluber will be replaced on the AL All-Star roster by Tampa Bay's Blake Snell.

UNDATED (AP) — DeMarco Murray is retiring from the NFL. The 2014 Offensive Player of the Year made the announcement on ESPN today, four months after being released by the Tennessee Titans. The 30-year-old lost his job to Derrick Henry last season and was due to make $6.25 million in 2018 when the Titans let him go. He ran for 659 yards and six touchdowns last season, dealt with a knee injury late in the year, and missed the Titans' final regular-season game and two playoff contests.

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Vegas Golden Knights have agreed to terms with three-time Stanley Cup champion goalie Marc-Andre Fleury on a three-year contract extension worth an average annual value of $7 million. Fleury had one year remaining on his contract. The extension would keep him with Vegas through the 2021-22 season, creating the possibility that the 33-year-old could end his career with the Golden Knights. Fleury helped the Golden Knights to the Pacific Division title and an appearance in the 2018 Stanley Cup Final in their inaugural season.

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The federal judge overseeing the NHL concussion case has denied class-action status for the former players suing the league over head injuries. Today's decision by U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson is the first significant victory for the league in a landmark lawsuit that was filed almost five years ago. Nelson wrote that "widespread differences" in state laws about medical monitoring, which the retired players are seeking, would "present significant case management difficulties."