LOS ANGELES (AP) _ Frank Sinatra's wife of 22 years and his three children were left most of his assets in a will filed Thursday, although his biggest asset _ rights to his music _ had been given to his children in a trust set up several years ago.

Sinatra's will parceled out assets that had yet to be given away, including his homes, an office building and cash.

Barbara Sinatra was left most of his real estate holdings. Among them was the couple's desert horse ranch, their Beverly Hills mansion and a Malibu beach house. She also received rights to market his name and likeness.

Mrs. Sinatra also was given the late entertainer's interest in a few of his early recordings, referred to as the ``Trilogy'' master recording.

Son Frank Sinatra Jr. and daughters Tina and Nancy will receive $200,000 each plus undivided interests in a Beverly Hills office building.

Sinatra, who died last week, added $1 million to a trust established earlier for his two grandchildren.

His entire assets had been reported to be valued at $200 million. But most of Sinatra's estate already was apportioned through a living trust set up several years ago to handle the rights to his music catalog, said his attorney, Harvey Silbert.

``There are very substantial assets in the trust,'' Silbert said.

Before the will was made public, Silbert discounted reports that Sinatra left as much as $150 million to the Barbara Sinatra Children's Center in Rancho Mirage. Silbert declined to say whether how much, if any money, was donated through the living trust. However, he said Sinatra left substantial amounts to charity during his lifetime.

Mrs. Sinatra was to receive up to $3.5 million of any assets left over after all the specific bequests are made. Any surplus above $3.5 million would go to the children. Whether that much in assets would be left after Sinatra's other instructions were carried out was yet to be determined, Silbert said.

``Nobody knows what the kids are getting. There's $3.5 million to Barbara and the rest to them, and that could be substantial,'' Silbert said. ``And then there's the trust.''

Silbert said it would probably be about a year before any of the heirs actually receive their inheritance because of the lengthy probate process.

Sinatra's first wife and mother of his children, Nancy Barbato Sinatra, was left $250,000; friend Elvina Joubert was left $150,000, stepson Robert Marx $100,000 and friend Dorothy Uhlemann $50,000.

Paintings, silverware, books, furniture, jewelry, automobiles, train collections, music collections and memorabilia also went to Mrs. Sinatra, but Sinatra instructed his executor to ``first return to any child of mine any of such items which said child may have given to me.''

Frank Sinatra Jr. was given all of his father's sheet music.