DA: Simpson Likely to Admit Killings But Claim He's Not Responsible With AM-Simpson-The Defense, Bjt

LOS ANGELES (AP) _ O.J. Simpson spent Father's Day in jail, weeping for the children he wasn't allowed to see. The district attorney said he believed Simpson would eventually admit that he killed his ex-wife and her friend.

Simpson, under a suicide watch in a special wing of Men's Central Jail, was visited Sunday by a psychiatrist and his lawyer, Robert Shapiro.

''He wished me a happy Father's Day and asked me to spend the morning with my two boys,'' Shapiro said. ''And then he started to cry and said 'I wish I could spend Father's Day with my children.'''

Simpson's children - Sydney, 9, and Justin, 6 - spent the day with the family of their slain mother in Orange County. The children were not allowed to watch news reports about the case.

''The children understand their mother is gone, but they're holding up well. We're a really close family and there's a lot of support here,'' said Denise Brown, sister of Simpson's slain ex-wife, Nicole.

Earlier Sunday, District Attorney Gil Garcetti predicted that Simpson would use a defense similar to Erik and Lyle Menendez, who admitted shooting their parents but blamed their actions on years of sexual and psychological abuse.

The Menendez brothers' first trials ended with hung juries.

''It's not going to shock me if we see an O.J. Simpson ... say 'OK I did do it but I'm not responsible,''' Garcetti said in an interview with ABC.

''It's going to be a likely defense here, I believe, once the evidence is reviewed by the lawyers,'' he said.

Shapiro said he would not comment on Garcetti's statements until after Simpson's arraignment Monday. Simpson has maintained his innocence.

Simpson is charged with two counts of murder and a special circumstance of multiple murder. If convicted and the jury finds the special circumstance to be true, he would be eligible for the death penalty.

Garcetti, interviewed on ABC's ''This Week With David Brinkley,'' denied a magazine report that he may have decided against the death penalty.

''I haven't even started thinking about it,'' he said.

Simpson's arraignment could be followed by a preliminary hearing in Municipal Court to determine if he should be bound over to Superior Court for trial.

A grand jury indictment would do away with the preliminary hearing and the case would go immediately to Superior Court. The Los Angeles Times reported that a grand jury is already hearing the case. Garcetti would not confirm the report.

The district attorney said the prosecution's ''most profound challenge'' will be selecting 12 jurors who will agree with the prosecution.

''The defense is always just looking for that one juror who might hang them up,'' Garcetti said.