HONOLULU (AP) — The Latest on a missile warning alert mistakenly sent in Hawaii (all times local):

3:35 p.m.

Hawaii's phone call to federal authorities to seek guidance after mistakenly sending an alert warning of a missile attack lasted only about a minute.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency told The Associated Press Wednesday that it received the call from Hawaii at 8:30 a.m.

Hawaii Emergency Management Agency spokesman Lt. Col. Charles Anthony says that call lasted approximately one minute.

In the end, it took nearly 40 minutes after the first alert was sent for the state to send another mobile alert saying that there was no missile headed to Hawaii.

A missile launched from North Korea would take about 20 minutes to hit Hawaii.

The state said part of the delay in sending the retraction was because they were awaiting FEMA approval. FEMA says the state did not require federal approval to cancel or retract the incorrect alert.

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3:25 p.m.

U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii says state and federal officials need to get the emergency alert system right.

The Democrat spoke to reporters Wednesday after he met with members of the state's congressional delegation and officials from federal agencies. The meeting came after Hawaii on Saturday mistakenly issued an alert that a missile was inbound to Hawaii. 

Officials took 23 minutes to call federal officials to get approval to rescind the alert, which wasn't needed. Hawaii residents didn't receive a retraction until 38 minutes after the alert.

Schatz says he expects reports from several federal agencies, along with the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency to be released sometime in the next few months. The reports will detail what happened, and how to fix it moving forward.

Schatz said the state has a long way to go to rebuild the trust of the people.

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3 p.m.

Hawaii state Legislature leaders say they want to make sure the islands never again experience a false alarm missile alert like last weekend's.

Lawmakers say they'll find out more on the issue Friday when the House and Senate public safety committees hold a joint hearing on the mishap.

Senate President Ronald Kouchi said in a speech Wednesday lawmakers will work with Gov. David Ige's administration to make sure every resident and guest of the state is safe. He says the state must also ensure everyone gets accurate information.

House Speaker Scott Saiki told reporters he expects more information about what happened to emerge over the next couple of weeks.

Saiki says lawmakers will then exercise more oversight and ensure the administration makes the changes that need to be made.

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2:35 p.m.

In the confusion over a false missile warning, police in Hawaii say 911 dispatchers told callers it was real and they didn't have information about shelters.

Big Island police spokesman Alan Richmond says the 911 line exploded with too many calls to count after state emergency management officials sent the alert by mistake Saturday.

A vehicle crash and a woman reporting that she was so upset she ran into the woods and stabbed herself in the arm were the only two incidents police could directly link to the scare.

Police officials say 911 callers were told to shelter indoors. After police received confirmation from the state that it was a mistake, dispatchers informed callers there was no real threat.

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12:40 p.m.

It took Hawaii officials more than 20 minutes to contact federal authorities to seek guidance after realizing they had sent out a bogus alert saying there was a missile headed toward the islands.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency told The Associated Press Wednesday that it received the call from Hawaii at 8:30 a.m.

FEMA spokeswoman Jenny Burke says federal employees gave guidance during that call.

In the end, it took nearly 40 minutes after the first alert was sent for the state to send another mobile alert informing residents and tourists that there was no incoming missile.

A missile launched from North Korea would take about 20 minutes to hit Hawaii.

The state said part of the delay in sending the retraction was because they were awaiting FEMA approval. FEMA says the state did not require federal approval to cancel or retract the incorrect alert.