PARIS (AP) _ Anatole Dauman, who discovered a number of French New Wave directors and went on to produce films by Wim Wenders and others, has died. He was 73.

The date or cause of death was not released.

He produced films with several directors who developed the New Wave movement, which arose in the 1950s around the idea that the decline of French cinema stemmed from a lack of fresh ideas among the country's ``old guard'' directors.

Dauman produced, among other movies, ``Night and Fog'' (1956) and ``Hiroshima Mon Amour'' (1958), both by director Alain Resnais, and ``Masculin, Feminin'' (1966) by Jean-Luc Godard.

With director Nagisa Oshima, Dauman produced ``Empire of the Senses'' (1976). Three years later, he collaborated with director Volker Schloendorff on ``The Tin Drum.'' He also worked closely with Wenders, producing ``Paris, Texas'' (1984), ``The Wings of Desire'' (1987) and ``Until the End of the World'' (1991).

France named him Chevalier of the Legion of Honor Commander of Arts and Letters, and he was decorated for his involvement in the Resistance. Germany awarded him its Cross of Merit for his lifelong work in film.

William Robert Isaly

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) _ William Robert Isaly, the last of three generations to own Isaly Dairy Co., died Wednesday. He was 81.

Beginning in the 1920s, Isaly worked at various jobs at the Dairy until becoming president and chairman of the board in 1961. He retired in the late 1960s.

The dairy formerly operated 20 plants and 400 stores in Ohio, Indiana, Iowa and Pennsylvania.

The company's signature products included quart-sized ``brick'' ice-cream, skyscraper cones and Klondike bars, introduced in the 1920s and made now by Good Humor-Breyers. The company also popularized chipped-ham sandwiches _ wafer-thin ham piled atop a bun with a special barbecue sauce.

Steve Lloyd

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) _ State Rep. Steve Lloyd, chairman of the House Environmental Committee, died Thursday on his 46th birthday of stomach cancer.

Lloyd was first elected to the House in 1990. His wife, Kathe, announced two weeks ago that she would seek election to her husband's seat this year.

Lloyd didn't attend legislative sessions this year, but came to the Capitol on Feb. 6 when the House passed a bill naming a wetlands near Lake Milford after him.

Gertrude B. Nielsen

WINNETKA, Ill. (AP) _ Gertrude B. Nielsen, the widow of television ratings giant A.C. Nielsen and a noted philanthropist, died Thursday. She was 100.

Nielsen was a major supporter of the Chicago Botanic Garden and helped establish the Gertrude B. Nielsen Child Care and Learning Center.

She committed over $60,000 towards a young trumpet player and artist's tuition when she learned that his family couldn't afford to send him to college.

Arthur Nielsen, founder of the ACNielsen Corp., was a marketing-research whiz who created the Nielsen Television Ratings. He died in 1980.

James T. Pyle

NEW YORK (AP) _ James T. Pyle, a leader in developing modern air control systems and the first deputy administrator for the Federal Aviation Agency, died Wednesday of complications from a stroke. He was 84.

Pyle helped develop a system of radar-based ground controls for airplanes and was responsible for imposing regulations requiring commercial pilots to retire at 60.

Pyle, who learned to fly at Princeton University, became special assistant to the assistant secretary of Navy for air in Washington in 1953. Three years later, he became head of the Civil Liberties Aeronautics Administration and made air safety a priority in the rapidly growing air-travel industry.