ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) _ A teen-ager has won a court order instructing her parents to stay away from her, a move the parents say infringes on their rights and responsibilities.

Last week, Superior Court Judge Victor Carlson issued a domestic violence writ against Stan and Joan Baltzo. He also ordered them to pay their 17-year- old daughter, Kitsel, $500 a month in support, and to return two cars she owns.

''It's been gut-wrenching,'' said Stan Baltzo, an oil company executive. ''... One night there's a fight, and the next she comes back with a court paper allowing her to purge the house of everything she claims she owns.

''It seems like when a minor is involved, the whole system of checks and balances is suspended.''

But Carlson said this week the law makes no exceptions when people ask the court for the kind of temporary protection granted Miss Baltzo.

''A domestic violence writ allows a person to seek relief, no matter what their age,'' he said. ''That is what the law is for.''

A domestic violence writ is most commonly brought against abusive husbands. Violation of such an order can lead to criminal charges.

Miss Baltzo has refused to discuss the case. John Reese, her court- appointed attorney - to be paid by her parents - said she feels that talking would only make things worse.

The West High School senior is living with relatives of her boyfriend while attorneys and social workers try to work out a solution.

Her father said the family had been getting along fine until October, when Kitsel started saying she preferred to spend time with her boyfriend rather than the family, her grades fell, and she became rebellious and uncontrollable.

According to court documents, the situation grew violent Jan. 27. Kitsel already had been away from home for four days, and had returned with friends to remove her belongings from the house. In court papers, both sides accused each other of assault. No criminal charges have been filed.

The following day, Miss Baltzo filed for the writ, charging her parents with abuse. While they were only allegations, Carlson said they were enough to justify the protective order.