Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Hawaii. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the Honolulu bureau at 808-536-5510 or aphonolulu@ap.org. Correspondent Caleb Jones can be reached at 808-536-5510 or cjones@ap.org.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

Hawaii at 2:30 p.m.

OF HAWAII INTEREST

FISHY BUSINESS

MONTAUK, N.Y.— Even after winter storms left East Coast harbors thick with ice, some of the country's top chefs and trendy restaurants were offering sushi-grade tuna supposedly pulled in fresh off the coast of New York. But it was just an illusion. No tuna was landing there. The fish had long since migrated to warmer waters. In a global industry plagued by fraud and deceit, conscientious consumers are increasingly paying top dollar for what they believe is local, sustainably caught seafood. But even in this fast-growing niche market, companies can hide behind murky supply chains that make it difficult to determine where any given fish comes from. That's where national distributor Sea To Table stepped in, guaranteeing its products were wild and directly traceable to a U.S. dock — and sometimes the very boat that brought it in. By Robin McDowell, Margie Mason and Martha Mendoza. SENT: 3,000 words, photos, video.

FROM AP MEMBERS

MONK SEAL KILLED

HONOLULU— A young monk seal found dead on the Hawaii island of Molokai last month had injuries that were intentionally caused, authorities said. SENT: 200 words.

CARPENTERS-POLITICAL ACTION COMMITTEE

HONOLULU— The Hawaii Regional Council of Carpenters is funding a new super political action committee in support of a Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor. SENT: 245 words.

IN BRIEF

— HAWAII PESTICIDE BAN— The state of Hawaii is banning a pesticide scientists have found could hinder the development of children's brains.

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The AP, Honolulu.