TOKYO (AP) — Shares are mostly higher in Europe and Asia after U.S. stocks jumped on news China is preparing to resume trade discussions with the U.S., the first negotiations in more than a month. Futures point to opening gains on Wall Street. Benchmark U.S. crude oil rose above $65.50 per barrel. The dollar fell against the yen and the euro.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — More than a thousand Google employees have signed a letter protesting the company's secretive plan to build a search engine that would comply with Chinese censorship. The letter calls on executives to review ethics and transparency at the company. The letter's contents were confirmed by a Google employee who helped organize it but who requested anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the debate.

UNDATED (AP) — Electric car maker Tesla's CEO Elon Musk admitted to The New York Times that stress is taking a heavy toll on him personally in what he calls an "excruciating" year. The newspaper said Musk alternated between laughter and tears during the interview in which he said he was working up to 120 hours a week and sometimes takes Ambien to get to sleep. The interview published Friday offered rare insights into Musk's personal life and thinking. He stood by his tweet last week saying he might take Tesla private and that he had secured the funding to do so.

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — At a time when big-box retailers are trying to offer the same conveniences as their online competitors, the biggest U.S. grocery chain is testing the use of driverless cars to deliver groceries in a Phoenix suburb. Kroger's pilot program launched Thursday morning with a robotic vehicle parked outside one of its own Fry's supermarkets in Scottsdale. A store clerk loaded the back seat with full grocery bags. A man was in the driver's seat and another was in the front passenger seat with a laptop. Both were there to monitor the car's performance.

NEW YORK (AP) — New York University is offering free tuition for all of its medical students. The Wall Street Journal reported Thursday the move is a first among major U.S. medical schools. Rising tuition and six-figure loans have been pushing new doctors into higher-paying fields and contributing to a shortage of researchers and primary care physicians. The associate dean for admissions and financial aid, Dr. Rafael Rivera, says there's a "moral imperative" to reduce debt.