Good afternoon! Here's a look at AP's general news coverage in Texas at this hour. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the Dallas AP at 972-991-2100, or, in Texas, 800-442-7189. Email: aptexas@ap.org

Reminder: This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central.

TOP STORIES:

IMMIGRANT-DEATH

RIO GRANDE CITY, Texas — A Honduran man who entered the U.S. illegally killed himself in a Texas jail despite guards checking on him every half-hour and a camera in his padded cell, authorities say. Marco Antonio Munoz, 39, was found unresponsive in his cell on the morning of May 13, a day after U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents brought him to the jail and two days after he was detained for entering the country illegally, the Starr County Sheriff's Office says in an incident report filed June 5 with the Texas attorney general's office and obtained Sunday by the Associated Press. The Washington Post , citing unnamed border agents with detailed knowledge of what occurred, reports that Munoz entered the country with his wife and their 3-year-old son, and that he became enraged and had to be restrained when agents said the family would be separated. SENT: 450 words.

ARMY FUTURES COMMAND-Q&A

The U.S. Army is scouting large cities to find a home for a new command headquarters so it will be close to academia and industry, a first for the service. The Army typically likes to put its facilities away from population centers because there is space to train in rural areas and operations won't disrupt the public. The new command will focus on what the Army of the future should look like. The Army wants to be near experts in technology and innovation who can help figure that out. Fifteen cities were in contention: Atlanta; Austin, Texas; Boston; Chicago; Dallas; Denver; Houston; Los Angeles; Minneapolis; New York; Philadelphia; Raleigh, North Carolina; San Diego; San Francisco; and Seattle. By Jennifer McDermott. SENT: 800 words, photo.

IN BRIEF:

— DALLAS-SHOOTING: Dallas police say they're investigating a shooting south of downtown that led to the death of an 18-year-old man.

— CENTRAL TEXAS-FATAL CRASH: Authorities say three people are dead and three seriously injured after a two-vehicle crash in Central Texas.

MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-TEXAS TOWN-BUMP STOCKS

MORAN, Texas — This tiny West Texas town is fading. The Houston Chronicle reports the Methodist church is for sale, the American Legion post is on the brink of closing and half the main drag is shuttered. Homes are falling in on themselves. But the city of Moran also is loved. The mayor, unpaid, fixes the gravel roads on his own tractor. Many grew up on this harsh yet beautiful land and do not plan to leave it. Moran is a town of "yessir" and "yes ma'am", of handshakes and hollers. It's a place where people know each other by the sound of an engine or color of a truck. And like anywhere else in rural Texas, few would know it existed — if not for the fact that it's home to the inventor of the bump stock. By Emily Foxhall, Houston Chronicle. SENT IN ADVANCE: 1,980 words, pursuing photos.

EXCHANGE-FEMALE FLYERS

SWEETWATER, Texas — Seventy-five years ago, Nell Bright stepped onto Avenger Field from Canyon, ready to serve. The Abilene Reporter-News reports a newly-minted pilot at 21 years old, she had joined the WASPs, or Women Airforce Service Pilots, which had just been relocated to Sweetwater. WASPs came from across the country. There were 1,102 of them who served during World War II, including those coming from more temperate climates. The school would teach the women how to fly a handful of the U.S. Army's aircraft. Eventually, WASPs would go on to fly every airplane in the Army's inventory and cumulatively log close to 60 million miles during the war. By Ronald W. Erdrich, Abilene Reporter-News. SENT IN ADVANCE: 800 words, with photos.

IN SPORTS

CAR--INDYCAR-DIXON'S SURGE

FORT WORTH, Texas — Even with the speed, Scott Dixon hadn't led a lap all season when he left Indianapolis. Now after two wins in eight days, Dixon is the IndyCar Series points leader. And he went on to the season title the last two times he won at Texas. By Stephen Hawkins. UPCOMING. 600 words by 3 p.m. CT.

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