TOP STORIES:

US-ISLAMIC STATE-AIRSTRIKES

WASHINGTON — The one-two-three punch of American and Arab airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria and Iraq was just the beginning, President Barack Obama and other leaders declared Tuesday. They promised a sustained campaign showcasing a rare U.S.-Arab partnership aimed at Muslim extremists. By Lolia C. Baldor and Bassem Mroue. AP Photos. AP Video.

With: OBAMA-ISLAMIC STATE; ISLAMIC STATE-TURKEY; ISLAMIC STATE-GLANCE; US-IRAN-SYRIA; ISLAMIC STATE-WARNINGS; ISLAMIC STATE-HOT PURSUIT.

UNITED NATIONS-GENERAL ASSEMBLY

UNITED NATIONS — Facing a world in turmoil from multiple crises ranging from wars in the Mideast and Africa to the deadly scourge of Ebola and growing Islamic radicalism, leaders from more than 140 countries open their annual meeting at the United Nations on Wednesday with few solutions. By Edith M. Lederer. AP Photos.

OBAMA-UNITED NATIONS

NEW YORK — President Barack Obama is addressing the United Nations as a commander in chief overseeing a war against militants in two Middle Eastern nations, a striking shift in the trajectory of a presidency that had been focused on ending conflicts in the region. By White House Correspondent Julie Pace. AP Photos.

UN-CLIMATE SUMMIT

UNITED NATIONS —The only thing rising faster than heat-trapping gases Tuesday were the statements of urgency by world leaders, who told each other at a United Nations summit how seriously they take global warming. Binding commitments and action are to come. President Barack Obama pressed other countries to follow the United States' lead on the issue, even as the summit revealed the many obstacles that stand in the way of wider agreements to reduce heat-trapping pollution. By Seth Borenstein and Dina Cappiello. AP Photos. AP Video.

With: OBAMA-CLIMATE SUMMIT; CLIMATE SUMMIT-FACT CHECK.

KHORASAN GROUP

WASHINGTON — The U.S. decision to strike the Khorasan Group to stop a possible terror attack represents a significant expansion of the largely secret war against core al-Qaida, a group President Barack Obama has proclaimed is "a shadow of its former self." By Intelligence Writer Ken Dilanian.

ISLAMIC STATE-WARNINGS

WASHINGTON — There is no indication of advanced al-Qaida or Islamic State group terror plotting inside the United States, but airstrikes in Syria may have temporarily disrupted attack planning against U.S. or Western targets, according to a security bulletin Tuesday from the FBI and the Homeland Security Department. By Alicia A. Caldwell and Eileen Sullivan.

ISLAMIC STATE-POLITICS

The recurring image in the latest Republican campaign ads is a lone militant walking across a barren land with the black banner of the Islamic State group. Six weeks to Election Day, the once back-burner issue of national security is suddenly at the forefront amid rising American fears and the U.S. military's expanded campaign to destroy extremists in Iraq and Syria. The GOP, more trusted by the public in recent national polls to deal with foreign policy and terrorism, is using the threat as a political cudgel against Democrats in several Senate and House races. By Donna Cassata. AP Photo.

as legal grounding for its overnight airstrikes against Islamic State militants and an al-Qaida affiliate inside Syria. By Stephen Braun.

WHITE HOUSE-SECURITY

WASHINGTON — Secret Service agents in Virginia and Washington earlier this summer twice interviewed an Army veteran accused of climbing over a White House fence during the weekend and running into the executive mansion in the two months before the embarrassing security breach, a federal law enforcement says. By Alicia A. Caldwell. AP Photos.

BIN LADEN SPOKESMAN

NEW YORK — Defiant to the end, Osama bin Laden's son-in-law was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison for acting as the voice of al-Qaida after the Sept. 11 terror attacks, telling a judge that there would be a price to pay for trying to "bury me alive." Sulaiman Abu Ghaith — the highest-ranking al-Qaida figure to face trial on U.S. soil since the attacks — quoted from the Quran, praised Allah and suggested his case would prompt a backlash in the Muslim world. By Tom Hays. AP Photo.

VENEZUELA-MADURO IN NEW YORK

NEW YORK — Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro is following in the footsteps of the late Hugo Chavez in his first presidential visit to the Big Apple. Maduro met with labor and peace activists at a Venezuelan-sponsored event in the South Bronx on Tuesday evening billed as an encounter between New York's progressive community and what a banner at the gathering proclaimed as "the people's president." By Eva Font and Joshua Goodman. AP Photo.

COLOMBIA-PRESIDENT

NEW YORK — Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said he expects Venezuela to win a seat on the U.N. Security Council and hopes the country will play a "constructive" role on the organization's most powerful body. By Alexandra Olson. AP Photos.

BRAZIL-DEFORESTATION

UNITED NATIONS — More than 30 countries set the first-ever deadline on Tuesday to end deforestation by 2030, but the feasibility of such a goal was eroded when a key player, Brazil, said it would not join. By Dina Cappiello and Alexandra Olson. AP Photo.

EBOLA ESTIMATES

NEW YORK — U.S. health officials present their worst-case, best-case scenarios for the Ebola epidemic in West Africa, warning that the number of infected people could rocket to at least 1.4 million by mid-January — or the outbreak could be winding down by then, if control efforts substantially increase. "I'm confident the most dire projections are not going to come to pass," says the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In the latest indication that the official toll of 5,800 infections and 2,800 deaths greatly underestimates the scale of the crisis, Sierra Leone's president says health workers found "many sick people and corpses" during a three-day lockdown of his country. By Medical Writer Mike Stobbe. AP Photos.

MISSING STUDENT

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Virginia — A suspect has been charged in the disappearance of a British-born University of Virginia student, but the man has not been apprehended, police said Tuesday night. AP Photos. AP Video.

MISSING AFGHAN SOLDIERS

BOSTON — Three Afghanistan National Army officers who vanished during training in Massachusetts are placed in the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement after being detained on the Canadian border, authorities say.

MEXICO-MONARCH BUTTERFLIES

GUADALAJARA, Mexico — Two charred bodies were discovered inside a burned-out vehicle in which a congressman and his driver were kidnapped at gunpoint the previous day, Mexican authorities say. SENT at 245 words.

POLICE BARRACKS SHOOTING

CANADENSIS, Pennsylvania — The manhunt for the survivalist accused of ambushing a state police barracks has narrowed to the rural area where he grew up and his parents still live, but the suspect has managed to elude capture despite the efforts of hundreds of law enforcement officials. By Kathy Matheson. AP Photos. AP Video.

BRAZIL-ELECTION-POOR VOTE

SAO PAULO — Life may still be tough for millions of poor Brazilians — but it's also never been better. And that's the key for President Dilma Rousseff's re-election bid. Rousseff and top rival Marina Silva are locked in a virtual tie among the middle class, but the president has a wide edge with poor voters because of generous welfare programs that have helped slash hunger and extreme poverty under the watch of her Workers Party. By Stan Lehman. SENT: 880 words, photos.

HILLARY CLINTON

NEW YORK — Hillary Rodham Clinton's 2008 presidential campaign emphasized her experience, competence and preparation to become president. Her 2016 pitch could be simpler: She'd be the first female president. By Ken Thomas. AP Photos.

UPS SHOOTING

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama — The man who killed two former co-workers and then himself at a UPS shipping center Tuesday had told some people that he was having problems at work but never suggested the situation might turn violent, his pastor says. By Jay Reeves. AP Photos.

BUSINESS:

CADILLAC-NEW YORK

DETROIT — Cadillac wants a jolt from the city that never sleeps. General Motors' 112-year-old luxury car division, founded in Detroit and named for the city's founder, is moving its headquarters to New York. By Auto Writers Dee-Ann Durbin and Tom Krisher. AP Photo.

SOUTHERN AUTOMAKERS-UNION

The head labor official on Daimler AG's supervisory board says he considers it "unacceptable" that the German automaker's Mercedes plant in Alabama stands alone among the company's factories around the world without union representation for its workers.

DRINKS-CALORIES

NEW YORK — Coke, Pepsi and Dr Pepper say they'll work to reduce the calories Americans get from beverages by 20 percent over the next decade by more aggressively marketing smaller sizes, bottled water and diet drinks. By Candice Choi. AP Photo.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT:

PEOPLE-KERRY WASHINGTON

NEW YORK — Kerry Washington wants women to look as powerful and put together as her TV persona.Fashion retailer The Limited has teamed up with the "Scandal" star and the show's costume designer, Lyn Paolo, for a collection inspired by the ABC drama, which premieres its fourth season on Thursday.

MUSIC-BLONDIES

NEW YORK — Forty-one years after Blondie hit the music scene, frontwoman Debbie Harry is looking back — but not through her music. Instead, band co-founder Chris Stein is offering an insider's view with a show of photographs that he began shooting before Blondie was formed. By Shelley Acoca. AP Photos.

MUSIC-TENNIS

NEW YORK — Besides terminal unhipness, the band Tennis has a practical reason to regret taking its name from an inside joke between founding couple Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley. By Entertainment Writer David Bauder.

FOOD-PAULA DEEN NETWORK

Former Food Network star Paula Deen is ready to tell her side of the story behind the racist remark that decimated her career, but you'll need to pay to hear it. Deen has been working on a documentary about herself and her downfall — triggered in 2013 by her acknowledgment that she'd used a racial slur in the past — but it will only be available to subscribers of her new website, the Paula Deen Network. Recipe content on the site will be free, but viewers will need to pay $9.99 a month to view videos. By Food Editor J.M. Hirsch. AP Photos.

FEATURES:

GO FOR THE FOOD-SANTA FE

SANTA FE, New Mexico — There is no shortage of good food in this northern New Mexico town, where the many casual and gourmet takes on the state's trademark chile dishes are almost as big a draw as the city's art galleries and festivals. By Jeri Clausing. AP Photos.

The question typically is not where to go, but where can you get a table.