PRO BASKETBALL

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time in WNBA history, a team has forfeited a game.

The league ruled that Las Vegas will get a loss for its game against Washington that was canceled when the Aces players decided not to play because of concerns about their health and safety after 26 hours of travel.

The Aces needed more than a day to get to Washington from Las Vegas because of flight delays and cancellations Friday. By the time the team reached its hotel it was 3:45 p.m. — about four hours before the scheduled tip. The Aces players talked things over and spoke by phone with the union Friday. They called the league to say they did not want to play.

The league said it "worked extensively" with both teams to find a "workable solution." The WNBA added it delayed the start of the game until 8 p.m. to give the Aces as much time as possible after their arrival.

HOCKEY

CHICAGO (AP) — Stan Mikita, the hockey great who helped the Chicago Blackhawks to the 1961 Stanley Cup title while becoming one of the franchise's most revered figures, died Tuesday. He was 78.

Mikita's family announced his death in a statement released by the team. No further details were provided, but the Hall of Famer had been in poor health after being diagnosed with a brain disorder called Lewy body dementia.

"He was surrounded by his loving family whom he fiercely loved," the family said in the statement.

Mikita spent his entire career with Chicago, beginning with his NHL debut in 1959 and running through his retirement after playing 17 games in the 1979-80 season. He is the franchise's career leader for assists (926), points (1,467) and games played (1,394), and is second to former teammate Bobby Hull with 541 goals.

Mikita remains the only NHL player in history to win the Art Ross (scoring champion), Hart (MVP) and Lady Byng (sportsmanship) trophies in the same season, and he accomplished the feat in consecutive years in 1967 and 1968. He became the first player to have his jersey retired by the Blackhawks in 1980, and was inducted into the Hall of Fame three years later.

PRO FOOTBALL

CLEVELAND (AP) — Browns Hall of Fame running back Jim Brown says he would never kneel during the national anthem.

The 82-year-old Brown, who championed civil rights during his NFL career and became a social activist in retirement, said he respects players' rights to do what they want but his preference is they would stand during the "Star Spangled Banner."

"I'll never kneel and I will always respect the flag," said Brown, who spoke before an HBO premiere of "Hard Knocks," which is chronicling the Browns in training camp.

Protests during the anthem have enveloped the league over the past two seasons, beginning when former San Francisco quarterback Colin Kaepernick took a knee to protest social injustice.

The NFL modified its anthem protocol in May, prohibiting demonstrations for 2018, but allowing players to remain in the locker room during the anthem.

The players' union filed a grievance, and the change has been tabled while the NFL and NFLPA work on a resolution.

BASEBALL

TORONTO (AP) — Boston Red Sox television analyst Jerry Remy is again battling cancer.

NESN announced Remy's latest diagnosis in a statement Tuesday. The network says "at this time, Jerry's focus is on his medical treatment." He was not a part of NESN's broadcast team for Tuesday night's game against the Blue Jays. The network did not disclose details of Remy's diagnosis or provide a timeline for how long he might be away.

The 65-year-old former Red Sox second baseman was first diagnosed with lung cancer in 2008, relapsed in 2013 and again twice in 2017. He returned this season for his 31st year broadcasting Boston's games.

Remy was a longtime smoker and has spoken publicly in favor of regular medical checkups.

SOCCER

LONDON (AP) — American sports magnate Stan Kroenke will take full ownership of Arsenal after winning a power struggle with a rival billionaire by securing a deal valuing the English Premier League club at 1.8 billion pounds ($2.3 billion).

Russian businessman Alisher Usmanov, who was denied a place on the Arsenal board by Kroenke despite building up his stake to 30 percent, has accepted defeat and agreed to sell up to the majority shareholder. Kroenke, who also owns the NFL's Los Angeles Rams, currently owns 67 percent of Arsenal and has taken a bank loan to spend 550 million pounds on Usmanov's shares.

The deal with Usmanov takes Kroenke beyond the 90 percent threshold that allows him to mount a mandatory bid for the remaining shares to gain 100 percent of the London club.

United States-based investment vehicle Kroenke Sports and Entertainment said it received an "irrevocable undertaking" from Usamanov's Red and White Securities to accept the offer for its 18,695 Arsenal shares as soon as possible. KSE said the holders of the remaining 3 percent of Arsenal will be entitled to receive 29,419.64 pounds for each share.