WASHINGTON (AP) _ In his baritone voice, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin observed that the world has grown used to the scene: another gathering of Middle East leaders at the White House to sign another Middle East peace agreement.

``You are not excited anymore,'' Rabin told an East Room audience. ``You have grown up accustomed to it.''

Not really.

An outpouring of foreign ministers, diplomats, Cabinet secretaries and members of Congress sat expectantly before Rabin and PLO chairman Yasser Arafat to witness the signing of an historic accord to transfer control of much of the Israeli-occupied West Bank to the Arabs who live there.

It was not as momentous as the 1993 agreement that brought Arafat and Rabin together at the White House for their historic handshake of peace. But no one was selling it short.

President Clinton called it a ``milestone on the path to reconciliation.'' Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak said it was ``another significant step on the road to peace.'' Jordan's King Hussein said the accord was ``the result of a commitment to peace, unwavering.''

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