Good morning! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up today in Texas. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to 972-991-2100.

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UPCOMING:

IMMIGRATION-SEPARATING FAMILIES

SAN DIEGO — Some immigrant toddlers are back in the arms of their parents, but others remained in holding facilities away from relatives as federal officials fell short of meeting a court-ordered deadline to reunite dozens of youngsters forcibly separated from their families at the border. Late last month, U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw in San Diego set a 14-day deadline to reunite children under 5 with their parents and a 30-day deadline for older children. It wasn't immediately clear how many children left detention facilities Tuesday or how many remain. By Elliot Spagat and Mike Householder. SENT: 910 words, with photos, video.

HOMELAND SECURITY-CENTRAL AMERICA

GUATEMALA CITY — U.S. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is creating an office within the department to help the governments of Central America and Mexico get information about reunifying families following their separation by the Trump administration. Nielsen met Tuesday in Guatemala with the foreign ministers of Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador and discussed the separated families and reunification effort. By Colleen Long. SENT: 390 words, with photos.

BORDER PROTECTION-de BLASIO

WASHINGTON — New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and his security detail violated both Mexican and U.S. immigration laws by crossing the border on foot during a visit near El Paso, Texas, U.S. Customs and Border Protection alleges in a letter obtained by The Associated Press. The mayor's office flatly denied the allegation. By Colleen Long. SENT: 420 words, with photos.

CAMPUS CARRY-TEXAS

NEW ORLEANS — Attorneys for three University of Texas professors were set to ask a federal appeals court Wednesday to revive their lawsuit against a law allowing people with concealed-handgun licenses to carry weapons on public campuses. A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans was hearing the arguments. According to court filings, the professors believe the presence of guns in their classrooms could discourage open academic discussion. By Kevin McGill. SENT: 220 words, with photo. Will be updated.

SCHOOL SHOOTING-TEXAS-SECURITY

SANTA FE, Texas — School leaders have authorized more than $1.5 million in security upgrades, including the installation of panic buttons, at a Southeast Texas high school where a gunman killed 10 people and wounded 13 others earlier this year. A teenage suspect remains in custody in the May shootings at Santa Fe High School. UPCOMING: 250 words.

IN BRIEF:

— MOSQUE FIRE — Prosecutors say a Texas man accused of torching a mosque made plans to create a "rogue unit" to monitor and possibly confront Muslims at the Islamic center in Victoria.

— LESSER PRAIRIE CHICKEN-SURVEY — A grouse that has been the focus of an ongoing legal battle over whether it warrants federal protection has seen its numbers increase by nearly 30 percent over the past year according to aerial surveys for the lesser-prairie chicken in New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas.

SPOT MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-RUSSIANS-HOUSTON

HOUSTON — An assortment of nesting dolls or "matryoshka" sit on glass shelves at the Russian Cultural Center. The Houston Chronicle reports some are in traditional Semenov style, hand-painted in traditional red, gold and black with leaves and vines wrapping around the wooden exteriors. These nesting dolls serve as an iconic symbol of Russian culture and tradition. But, Sophia Grinblat, executive director of the Russian Cultural Center near Rice Village, smiles knowingly as she explains nesting dolls appeal more to foreigners. With the upcoming Trump-Putin summit in Helsinki, tensions between the U.S. and Russia have only escalated. By Elizabeth Myong, Houston Chronicle. SENT: 810 words, pursuing photos.

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