IN THE NEWS: CONGRESS-SOCIAL MEDIA

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Mark Warner of Virginia is blasting Google for a response to lawmakers' inquiries about its reported plans to launch a search engine in China that would comply with censorship laws.

Warner says he is "truly disappointed" with a letter from Google CEO Sundar Pichai that arrived Friday, before a Senate hearing Wednesday in which Google will not have a representative present.

Pichai said in the letter he wasn't able to answer detailed questions and said the question of whether it would release a search engine in China "remains unclear."

Warner says any Google effort to get back into China could help the Chinese government repress its citizens. Google says despite pulling its search engine from China in 2010, it still employs hundreds of workers there.

IN THE NEWS: ROBOTIC SAILBOATS

SOUTHAMPTON, England (AP) — All summer, the small boat drifted steadily eastward across the churning North Atlantic until it neared the Irish coast, where it made history by becoming the first unmanned sailboat to cross the Atlantic.

The SB Met, built by Norwegian company Offshore Sensing AS, reached the finish line of the Microtransat Challenge for robotic boats on Aug. 26, two and a half months after setting off from Newfoundland. More than 20 previous attempts by various teams to complete the Microtransat since it began in 2010 have ended in failure.

It's a milestone that shows the technology for unmanned boats is robust enough to carry out extended missions that can dramatically cut costs for ocean research, border security, and surveillance in rough or remote waters. Under the Microtransat's rules, boats up to 2.6 yards long can sail between Europe and the Caribbean or North America and Ireland. They must regularly transmit location data.

While self-driving cars have to contend with pedestrians and other traffic, autonomous boats face storms that bring fierce gales and high waves as well as numerous seaborne hazards.

IN THE NEWS: TRILLION DOLLAR AMAZON

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon has become the second publicly traded company to be worth $1 trillion, hot on the heels of Apple.

Amazon has revolutionized how people shop online and is the world's dominant internet retailer. In two decades the company expanded far beyond its bookseller beginnings, combining its world-spanning retail operation with less flashy but very profitable advertising and cloud computing businesses.

The company's blowout success made its founder and CEO, Jeff Bezos, No. 1 on Forbes' billionaires list this year.

The Seattle-based company has cemented customer loyalty through smart devices like Alexa and the Prime membership program that offers fast, free shipping as well as music and video streaming perks.

Amazon's stock rose 1.7 percent, putting its market value at just over $1 trillion. Apple topped that mark in early August.