WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a Justice Department review of a program for detained immigrants (all times local):

5 p.m.

A nonprofit group that manages a program aimed at helping detained immigrants navigate the country's complex immigration court system says a Justice Department review of the program was flawed.

The Justice Department review found that people in the program had longer detentions and were less likely to get lawyers than people not in it. It also found that some of the program's participants were more likely to eventually be allowed to stay in the country.

The Justice Department manages the Legal Orientation Program through a contract with the New York-based Vera Institute of Justice.

The institute said Wednesday cases are significantly more likely to be completed faster because of the program. It has called on Congress to investigate before adopting the Justice Department review's results.

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1:55 p.m.

A Justice Department review found that a program aimed at helping immigrants navigate the U.S. immigration court system has resulted in longer detention stays for participants.

The report obtained Wednesday by The Associated Press also found cases were longer and court proceedings were also longer for those in the program.

It found detained program participants were more likely to be allowed to stay in the country.

The Legal Orientation Program costs about $8 million annually. It's managed by the Justice Department through a contract with the New York-based Vera Institute of Justice.

Vera has said the program helps more than 50,000 people each year.

The review began in November and includes data from 155,000 migrant participants compared with 350,000 who were not involved.

Two other phases are still being completed.