TAKOMA PARK, Md. (AP) _ If no one is home when Goldie Hawn returns on her annual visits to the brick duplex in this Washington, D.C., suburb where she grew up, she finds a neighbor to let her in.

Once, the actress sneaked in through a front window the owner had left unlocked, and then wandered around.

That someone else lives there, and has for 23 years, doesn't hinder her. In her new book, ``Goldie: A Lotus Grows in the Mud,'' Hawn calls the current occupant ``the nice lady I know who bought the house from Mom.''

Recently, the owner, Donna Wulkan, renovated the kitchen, but she told The Washington Post that she's afraid to break the news to Hawn, should she stop by again.

``I think she would like it to look exactly like it always looked,'' Wulkan says.

Hawn's book, which she's currently promoting, is partly a love song to her hometown. Through two husbands and three children and dozens of houses out West, Takoma Park has remained ``the Holy Grail of my Mind,'' she writes.

The street is still much the same as when she grew up. Hawn's old house is the only semidetached on the block, set back behind a full garden.

``I don't always go in,'' she tells The Post of her visits. ``Sometimes I just drive by and look and cry.''