IN THE NEWS: FACEBOOK AND PHOTOS

NEW YORK (AP) — You've heard a lot about "fake news." Now, Facebook is starting to crack down on "fake photos." The popular social networking site is broadening its fact-checking program to include photos and videos, along with text-based stories. The effort is aimed at combating malicious groups seeking to sow political discord in the U.S. and elsewhere by using doctored photos and manipulated video to gin up controversy. Facebook says its 27 third-party fact-checkers will now be examining disputed images and clips. And Facebook says it will label as such images or video found to be untrue or misleading.

IN THE NEWS: FREE MOBILE APPS AND PRIVACY

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — What's the price of a free app? Some would say zero — but a new study is warning that such "free" apps can come at the cost of your privacy. Researchers are warning that many popular free mobile apps — especially those aimed at kids — may be breaking U.S. law designed to protect the privacy of young people. Earlier this week, New Mexico filed a lawsuit against Google and other online portals, claiming they aren't doing enough to protect users from prying eyes. Experts say there is little that parents can do, since it's often impossible to tell when a site is sucking up personal information as young'uns blissfully play away.

ON THE WEB: WV DOING AWAY WITH BUG

CYBERSPACE (AP) — The iconic Volkswagen Beetle is about to be squashed. After selling it on and off in the U.S. for nearly seven decades, the German automaker is ending global production of the bug. The compact vehicle was first introduced in Germany in 1938 during the Nazi era — and hit the U.S. in 1949, where it became the go-to buggy for hipsters. It also was the subject of a popular travel game, as people would search out Beetles — or "punch buggies." Doing so before others in the car earned you the right to sock them on the arm.

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Online:

Volkswagen site: http://www.vw.com

IN STORES: APPLE WATCH MOVING TOWARD BEING A MEDICAL DEVICE

CUPERTINO, Calif. (AP) — Don't look now — but it looks like the Apple Watch is trying to make the transition from being a device for people with more money than practicality — to being a way to achieve better health. The Series 4 watch is due out later this month. And Apple is adding to it the ability to take high-quality heart readings. That will help users to set and meet fitness goals in their workouts. The new incarnation of the Apple Watch can also detect falls. When it does, and the user doesn't respond to prompts to verify he or she is OK — the watch will summon help. One analyst says the health benefits may lead some health insurance plans to subsidize the cost of an Apple Watch.

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Online:

Apple site: http://www.apple.com

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Follow Oscar Wells Gabriel II on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OWGabriel2